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How To Stop Fermentation?


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#1 David_Québec

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Posted 19 December 2005 - 08:02 PM

I would like to know something...

If i want to stop a fermentation because my sugar level is as i want it but it's still fermenting... is there a way?

If i let fermenting the alcool will continue to rise(too much) and later if i add sugar the yeast will probably restart a fermentation.

What can i do to control this process?

Add sulfite like crazy?
add something to kill the yeast?
take a less active yeast that dies at 12% (if this kind of yeast exist? )

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#2 mxgolfcpu

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Posted 19 December 2005 - 08:46 PM

David,

I am betting you are in Quebec smile.gif . Right now it is pretty cold in Quebec. A good way to stop fermentation is to cool your wine. Set it outside or in the garage for a little while until it is sufficiently cool to stop the fermentation, dont let it freeze. Then add sorbate to kill the yeast or sterile filter to remove the yeast.

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#3 David_Québec

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Posted 19 December 2005 - 09:03 PM

QUOTE (mxgolfcpu @ Dec 19 2005, 11:18 PM)
David,

I am betting you are in Quebec smile.gif .  Right now it is pretty cold in Quebec.  A good way to stop fermentation is to cool your wine.  Set it outside or in the garage for a little while until it is sufficiently cool to stop the fermentation, dont let it freeze.  Then add sorbate to kill the yeast or sterile filter to remove the yeast.

Cameron


Cold wink.gif it's around -10 Celcius tonight ! that's about 20 farenhaight maybe...
it's pretty cold!

I as this because i will soon do a maple mead and i want to have a "not too high alcool" mead (around 12% and a bit sweet)

that's why i ask!




As for the SORBATE what this product do? neutralise the yeast?
does it taste something that could ruin my mead?

Thanks
*********************************************
Carboy section :D
MM Meglioli 2007 Rojo Grande (bulk)
MM Renaissance Pinot Bianco (bottled)
RJSpagnols Bush Vine Grenache (bulk on stavin cubes)
WE Blueberry pinot noir Island Mist (bottled)
Cellarcraft South African Shiraz limited 2007 (secondary)
Cellarcraft Red Mountain Cab Sauv limited 2007 (bulk on stavin cubes)
WE Island Mist Green apple riesling (primary)
*********************************************
Quote of the Home Winemaker
"the Vandergrift Principle of Home Winemaking: consumption always rises to match available wine sources."
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#4 junker37

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Posted 19 December 2005 - 09:12 PM

20F, man, that seems pretty warm right now, we hit -8F today. Sorbate is used to stabilize, it stops the yeasts ability to reproduce, but it doesn't kill it, so trying to add it to stop a fermentation at a certain point with it would be difficult. It will not impart any taste to the wine/mead, and it should be added, along with k-meta, to any wine/mead that you sweeten up to prevent it from starting fermentation again. I would use a yeast with a low alcohol tolerance and also add sorbate.

#5 Psyguy

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 07:33 AM

As junker said, sorbate will keep the yeast from reproducing. The mature yeast will eventually die out without a new generation to replace them. If you are in the middle of fermentation, though, you have millions of yeast cells that, although they can't reproduce, will still ferment the sugar.

If it were me, I'd either cool the wine down to near freezing to stop fermentation, leave it there for a few weeks, then rack off the sediment and stabilize with sorbate & k-meta (in the hopes that some of the yeast will die or settle to the bottom during those few weeks, and the remaining sugars will be saved with sorbate), or let if finish (to a higher alcohol level) and blend it with a low-alcohol wine.

Next time, either use a yeast that will die out around 12 - 14%, or adjust your SG to that potential alcohol level, let it ferment dry, then stabilize it and sweeten it back up to taste.
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#6 ScottS

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 08:41 AM

Yep, your best option is to use a different yeast.

Sulfite and sorbate additions during an active fermentation probably won't work. Sorbate definitely won't work, sulfite in huge quantities might.

Chilling is a maybe, though you are going to have to get it pretty close to freezing and then stabilize.

Pasteurizing will definitely work, though that is difficult.

Adding a bunch of alcohol to kill of the yeast is another sure thing. That's how port is made.

#7 Psyguy

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 11:54 AM

QUOTE (ScottS @ Dec 20 2005, 10:13 AM)
Adding a bunch of alcohol to kill of the yeast is another sure thing.  That's how port is made.


I had thought of that one, Scott, but he mentioned having the alcohol rise too much. Still, it's a good point to make in the general discussion of trying to stop fermentation.
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#8 ScottS

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 02:51 PM

QUOTE (Psyguy @ Dec 20 2005, 12:26 PM)
I had thought of that one, Scott, but he mentioned having the alcohol rise too much.  Still, it's a good point to make in the general discussion of trying to stop fermentation.

One wrinkle on this issue is that if you let it ferment to 18-20% by itself, it's going to take a LONG time to age out. If you add aged alcohol, say something you bought or made previously, the additional alcohol doesn't increase the aging time. I don't know what his original concern with the high alcohol content was, but you can both stop fermentation and avoid the long aging times if you do it right.

#9 David_Québec

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Posted 20 December 2005 - 07:53 PM

QUOTE (ScottS @ Dec 20 2005, 05:23 PM)
One wrinkle on this issue is that if you let it ferment to 18-20% by itself, it's going to take a LONG time to age out.  If you add aged alcohol, say something you bought or made previously, the additional alcohol doesn't increase the aging time.  I don't know what his original concern with the high alcohol content was, but you can both stop fermentation and avoid the long aging times if you do it right.


I just dont wanty to have a 18% or more drink.
12 % (like wine) is a good point not too strong and not to weak. I also want to taste the great maple sirup smile.gif
*********************************************
Carboy section :D
MM Meglioli 2007 Rojo Grande (bulk)
MM Renaissance Pinot Bianco (bottled)
RJSpagnols Bush Vine Grenache (bulk on stavin cubes)
WE Blueberry pinot noir Island Mist (bottled)
Cellarcraft South African Shiraz limited 2007 (secondary)
Cellarcraft Red Mountain Cab Sauv limited 2007 (bulk on stavin cubes)
WE Island Mist Green apple riesling (primary)
*********************************************
Quote of the Home Winemaker
"the Vandergrift Principle of Home Winemaking: consumption always rises to match available wine sources."
Tim V.




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