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Grafting Onto Wild Muscadines


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#1 Herb_08161947

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Posted 01 December 2005 - 03:39 PM

Can I graft concord onto wild muscadine root stock? If so what is the best age to graft the scion and the best age for the rootstock? I suspect this may be a bit of a stretch, given that they are different species, but if it works the wild muscadine is incredibly vigorous in this area.

Herb

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#2 Purple Tooth

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Posted 03 December 2005 - 03:53 PM

Herb, I'm not sure, but why not try it. I had some instructions from a fellow in Wenatchee who does whole orchards and vineyards from Washington to California, but grapes even v v never turned out while everything I did with filberts and fruit trees worked great.

But I'll relay their technique, which is different than you'll find in most grafting books.

Scion are about pencil size. sharpen the one end on both sides so it comes together like the blade of a knife, the bevel about 2 + or so inches. They were doing old vineyard vines and so was I, - but I would think root stock closer to the scion size might be easier. Cut a slit in the root stock. Not across the center - but to one side and instead of trying to slip the sion straight in to match - push the scion in at about 45 degrees. It should protrude out the other side That way you have 4 contact points on each side. Rap with grafting rubber bands and coat with a special grafting tar. Paint white. I'm not sure what I did wrong with the grapes, maybe it was too early or they bled too much. You can cut below the graft to stop some of the bleding.

I'm ready to try grafting some of my grapes again so any expert please correct on.

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#3 rpoelking

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 08:44 AM

QUOTE (Herb_08161947 @ Dec 1 2005, 06:11 PM)
... the wild muscadine is incredibly vigorous in this area.


What area might that be?
Concord (from local grapes) [Secondary fermentation]
Napa Chardonnay (Regina) [Secondary fermentation]
Napa Shiraz (Regina) [Secondary fermentation]

#4 Herb_08161947

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 06:46 PM

QUOTE (rpoelking @ Dec 23 2005, 09:16 AM)
What area might that be?



Eastern North Carolina - about 40 miles inland from the mouth of the Cape Fear.

Herb

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Retired and growing grapes near the coast of NC
34°46'43.13"N 78°29'9.65"W

#5 rpoelking

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 08:53 AM

QUOTE (Herb_08161947 @ Dec 23 2005, 09:18 )
Eastern North Carolina - about 40 miles inland from the mouth of the Cape Fear.
Herb

Ok, I was just curious because it seems that's the only grape that grows in FL. I just moved to JAX and I hope that when we buy our next place I can grow something besides Muscadines. I'm not really crazy about their flavor.
Concord (from local grapes) [Secondary fermentation]
Napa Chardonnay (Regina) [Secondary fermentation]
Napa Shiraz (Regina) [Secondary fermentation]

#6 fernvally

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Posted 27 December 2005 - 10:01 AM

Two words
Rabbiteye Blueberries.

There are varieties that will grow in Northern FL. I love Blueberry wine.
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#7 Herb_08161947

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Posted 30 December 2005 - 12:13 PM

QUOTE (rpoelking @ Dec 27 2005, 09:25 AM)
Ok, I was just curious because it seems that's the only grape that grows in FL. I just moved to JAX and I hope that when we buy our next place I can grow something besides Muscadines. I'm not really crazy about their flavor.


It's really only a little cooler here than JAX - but we do get some ice here and the vines do go dormant. I would suspect many bunch-grapes would go dormant there. I seem to have no trouble growing Catawba, Niagra, and Concord. I just this fall made a small quanitiy of wine from my Catawba - it was a learning experience - one should not operate heavy equipment while drinking my Catawba wine...... <grin>

Herb

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Barukh ata Adonai Eloheinu Melekh ha‑olam, bo're p'ri ha‑gafen.
Retired and growing grapes near the coast of NC
34°46'43.13"N 78°29'9.65"W

#8 eurekawines

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Posted 30 December 2005 - 01:35 PM

Look on Jack Keller's homepage. There is featured book "The Lure of the Vine
by Thomas Dewolf "

Quote:
For many years, grape farmers in the southern United States have dreamed of creating an ideal grape by combining the strength and disease resistance of the Muscadine grape with the traditional wine quality of the Vinifera grape.

#9 Pat H.

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 04:43 PM

QUOTE (Herb_08161947 @ Dec 1 2005, 06:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Can I graft concord onto wild muscadine root stock? If so what is the best age to graft the scion and the best age for the rootstock? I suspect this may be a bit of a stretch, given that they are different species, but if it works the wild muscadine is incredibly vigorous in this area.

Herb


Sorry for the reply to this older message. I don't think you can graft other grape varieties to muscadines. Muscadine's have 40 chromasomes while just about all other grapes, wild or domesticated, have 38.




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