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#1 heyvern

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Posted 15 November 2005 - 11:34 AM

I'd like to make wine from craisins (dried cranberries). I have a recipe for raisin wine that uses 12 lbs raisins and 8 lbs sugar. Could I simply substitute 12 pounds of craisins for the 12 lbs of raisins? Or would I have to adjust other things like sugar, acid, etc.?

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#2 Psyguy

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Posted 15 November 2005 - 12:06 PM

I think I'd try the raisin recipe with the craisins as a substitute. If your recipe has a delay in adding the yeast (like it calls for adding k-meta & pectic enzyme early and then pitch the yeast after 12 hours), I think I'd do my final SG & acid checks after the craisins have soaked for the 12 hours.
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#3 sour grapes

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Posted 15 November 2005 - 05:02 PM

QUOTE (heyvern @ Nov 15 2005, 12:06 PM)
I'd like to make wine from craisins (dried cranberries).  I have a recipe for raisin wine that uses 12 lbs raisins and 8 lbs sugar.  Could I simply substitute 12 pounds of craisins for the 12 lbs of raisins?  Or would I have to adjust other things like sugar, acid, etc.?

smileyiamwithstupid.gif


Are craisins completely dry like other dry fruit? If they are you better do a search on using dried fruit, I think you need alot less fruit when it is dried because it is concentrated flavor. just substituting my be over kill for the type of fruit used.

#4 heyvern

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 08:39 AM

QUOTE (sour grapes @ Nov 15 2005, 06:34 PM)
Are craisins completely dry like other dry fruit?  If they are you better do a search on using dried fruit, I think you need alot less fruit when it is dried because it is concentrated flavor. just substituting my be over kill for the type of fruit used.


Yes, they are dried like raisins. I would be substituting dried fruit (craisins) for dried fruit (raisins). I was mostly concerned with differences of sugar content between the two fruits. I'm probably being way too anal about this stuff. A friend of mine says "You can make wine out of ANYTHING."

I've been thinking of not only soaking the craisins for 12 hours, like PSYguy suggested, but perhaps pouring boiling water over them and soaking for a while (or maybe boiling them for a minute), them mushing them up before adding the remainder of ingredients. That way, I could measure ALL THE SUGARS when I measure initial specific gravity?

Please remember that I am completely new to this winemaking stuff. I really have no idea of what I'm doing. 11doh.gif I bought two books to get me started, but you know how difficult it is to learn a new hobby without a mentor. We tend to make really stupid mistakes that a mentor would quickly correct.

Wish me luck,
Vern

#5 Curt

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 10:32 AM

Vern,
I don't think I'd boil them because it might set the pectin in them and that will lead to frustratingly hard to clear wine. Craisins are also likely a lot more acidic that raisins so take that into account. I would chop them up before using them too. You might want to start with a one gallon experimental batch to see how it goes. Whatever you decide remember to have fun with it.

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#6 sour grapes

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 10:54 AM

i think you would need more sugar when using the craisins. But on the outset be careful how much sugar you use, sugar in recipes is only a guide, you can easily overshoot the gravity you desire by adding it all at one time. Your on the right track though. You could boil your water and disolve the sugar then add your craisins to the hot water to soak over night, the next morning when the must has cooled add your pectic enzyme and other ingredients. Let that sit for 12 hours (I use 24 hours) then check the gravity. If sugar is needed, I then disolve it directly in the must in another bowl. Then add the yeast You could ferment up to 10 days on the fruit, but the longer it sits, the more the fruit breaks down so use a fine bag.
I hope that helps
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#7 Jack Keller

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Posted 16 November 2005 - 11:04 AM

QUOTE
I would be substituting dried fruit (craisins) for dried fruit (raisins).  I was mostly concerned with differences of sugar content between the two fruits.  I'm probably being way too anal about this stuff.  A friend of mine says "You can make wine out of ANYTHING." 

I've been thinking of not only soaking the craisins for 12 hours, like PSYguy suggested, but perhaps pouring boiling water over them and soaking for a while (or maybe boiling them for a minute), them mushing them up before adding the remainder of ingredients.  That way, I could measure ALL THE SUGARS when I measure initial specific gravity?

Vern, when in doubt look for a proven recipe. Go to Requested Recipes and scroll down to "Cranberry (Dried) Wine." This recipe made a powerful wine (about 17% alcohol), so reduce the sugar to 1-3/4 pounds per gallon for a more traditional (12-13%) wine.

Your friend is mostly right. You can make wine out of anything fermentable. If it is fermentable and non-toxic, so much the better. But ingredient quantity does differ from fruit to fruit. Cranberries are much more acidic than raisins and do not contain nearly as much sugar, so you cannot simply exchange one for the other.

Soaking in warm water would be okay, but stay away from boiling water when you don't know the pectin count of the fruit. You could be inviting a severe haze that is difficult to get rid of.

#8 heyvern

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 06:37 PM

Thanks for the recipe, Jack. I'll use it. What do you think about using bentonite finings and also filtering it?

Everybody's advice makes good sense. Thanks to you all. I sure knew nothing about the pectin and resulting haze thing.

I have two recipes for raisin wine. They both use lots of "Acid Blend" in them. I noticed that the fresh cranberry wine, which I have fermenting right now, uses very little acid blend, and Jack's recipe uses none. I suspect this reflects the difference in acidity between the two fruits. You guys refered to the different acidity. Right on.

One of my recipes uses more raisins than sugar and one uses equal amouts of raisins and sugar. You guys told me to use more sugar for craisins and Jack's recipe uses a bunch of sugar. Right on!

Anyway, I bought 12 pounds of craisins at the local food coop. The ingredients are: cranberries, sugar, and sunflower oil. They're really good! Ok, I only have about 11.5 pounds left. smile.gif I'm leary about the sunflower oil(?). But, I dug out my old hand-powered mincer/grinder and think I'm about ready to give it a go!



This is gonna be GREAT! smileytoast.gif

Vern

#9 Jack Keller

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Posted 17 November 2005 - 07:23 PM

QUOTE
What do you think about using bentonite finings and also filtering it?

Vern, No problem with either, but I would recommend only filtering if you need to. It serves little purpose to filter a wine that doesn't need filtering, or, if you have a sterile filter and want to remove any stay-behind yeast prior to bottling or sweetening. In the latter case, it is still prudent to stabilize the wine after filtering, as most filters designed for home use only catch 95% of the yeast (and 5% will multiply like crazy when sugar is added if you don't stabilize).

#10 edbjr76

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Posted 01 December 2005 - 12:42 AM

Id really like to know how well you fare out. I havehad some curosity in making cranberry wine. if this all works out please let me know, I would like a recipe.I am currently experimenting with some pomegranite/cranberry wish me luck!!!!

#11 pudo

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Posted 04 December 2005 - 01:09 PM

Bottled 325~ bottles of Cranberry from last year using 250~lbs of cranberries.

Only have about 100 left.

I ordered 500lb this year. This should put me over my legal limit for the year, so see you guys next year.










Just kidding.
pudo

#12 Jack Keller

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 01:38 PM

QUOTE
Id really like to know how well you fare out. I have had some curosity in making cranberry wine. if this all works out please let me know, I would like a recipe.

edbjr76, a two-year old cranberry wine tastes more like White Zinfandel than anything else. Most people, however, never learn this because they drink it too soon (Pudo...).

If you like White Zin, try it. My recipe is at Making Wines from Wild Plants -- scroll down to "Highbush Cranberry Wine."

#13 jwingo

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 03:14 PM

I have some highbush cranberries in the freezer right now.....cant wait to free up some carboy space.
jeff
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#14 pudo

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 05:03 PM

Jack, Why not drink it as it ages? smile.gif I called my berry guy today and made my 500lb order final. It should arive to the loading dock at work by weeks end. 53 cents/lb. I think I saw them for $1.50lb in the store on sale once.

That brings me to remember a friend that is a produce manager at a local grocery store. He said almost all produce is marked up at least 100% from cost. Asking him about waste and he said only about 1% goes to waste. The store's produce is the cheapest around.

500lb using 3lb/gal....5~bottles/gal should be roughly 800 bottles. I think I have to wait to add the yeast till Jan 1. .... Or is the "yearly limit" within a 12 month span, or does it restart on the year?

Now all I need to order is about 15 more carboys, them i'm set!

I'll be in the garage scraping lables off bottles.
pudo

#15 heyvern

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Posted 06 December 2005 - 09:47 AM

QUOTE (pudo @ Dec 5 2005, 06:35 PM)
I'll be in the garage scraping lables off bottles.
pudo


Nothing else to do this time of year in NE MN anyway. tongue.gif

Vern
Grand Marais, MN

PS- My Cranberry-red grape is almost ready to add finings and my Craisin is bubbling away happily. I'll have to wait quite a while before commenting on either one, edbjr76. These are only my 4th and 5th wines, But I now have three 6 gal batches of wine, one 5 gal batch of dry mead, and one 5 gal batch of Dopplebock (sp?) lager brewing. The house smells pretty good! Is this wine-making thing a disease?




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