Jump to content


Photo

De-stoning Chokecherries


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 neilt

neilt

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 182 posts
  • Location:MB, Canada

Posted 22 August 2005 - 09:41 AM

I was reading some recipes on Jack Kellars site, and noticed that each recipe said to de-stone the chockecherries. Is this necessary? Can I ferment the berries with the pits, as long as they arn't broken? Or, will I have several bottles of delicious Cyanide wine?

#2 Curt

Curt

    Bumbling Idiot

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3585 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The woods of northern MN
  • Interests:wine and winemaking
    karate
    woodworking
    photography
    hunting

Posted 22 August 2005 - 09:44 AM

Sheesh! I'd have been dead loooong ago if that were the case! It does make the wine more bitter to the taste, but then I like Guinness. biggrin.gif

what's brewing; 6gal local plum  6gal strawberry/rhubarb  6gal pinot noir  6gal blueberry/grape  6gal old vine zin  9gal local apple


#3 tcampbell

tcampbell

    Veteran Wine Maker

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 242 posts
  • Location:Montrose, CO

Posted 22 August 2005 - 09:57 AM

I don't know about you, but I've never seen a chokecherry de-stoner and I sure don't have time to de-stone 99 gazillion chokecherries by hand.

#4 Curt

Curt

    Bumbling Idiot

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3585 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The woods of northern MN
  • Interests:wine and winemaking
    karate
    woodworking
    photography
    hunting

Posted 22 August 2005 - 10:56 AM

You could use one of those cone shaped jelly sieves with the wooden cone that is used inside it or, I suppose, you could run them through a juicer. I've done the first but not the second. Way too pesty for me. biggrin.gif

what's brewing; 6gal local plum  6gal strawberry/rhubarb  6gal pinot noir  6gal blueberry/grape  6gal old vine zin  9gal local apple


#5 tcampbell

tcampbell

    Veteran Wine Maker

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 242 posts
  • Location:Montrose, CO

Posted 22 August 2005 - 10:58 AM

QUOTE
You could use one of those cone shaped jelly sieves with the wooden cone that is used inside it or, I suppose, you could run them through a juicer. I've done the first but not the second. Way too pesty for me.


I've done the first also, but I won't do it again.

#6 Lush

Lush

    Wine Padawan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 582 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Iraq via Montana
  • Interests:Let's go fishin'!<br />Makin' wine in some shape or form since 1984.

Posted 22 August 2005 - 11:25 AM

We have a bumper crop of chokecherries this year where I live. Anyways, I use 4 lbs per gallon in my wine recipe. My creek bottom is pretty much chokecherry trees, alders and cottonwoods. The trick for making good chokecherry wine (learned from the Hutterite colony) is to freeze your berries. This draws out the juice better. Make sure you use a large mesh bag in your primary. The pits won't hurt your wine as long as you don't crush them. You're safe there. Here's the ingredients in my 5 gallon recipe that's pretty good-
1. 20 lbs. frozen chokecherries
2. 2 cans Welches purple grape concentrate
3. 4 1/2 gallons water
4. 12 lbs. sugar
5. 2 1/2 tsp acid blend
6. 2 1/2 tsp Pectic Enzyme
7. 5 tsp Yeast Nutrient
8. 5 Campden tablets
1 pkg Pasteur Champagne yeast

Starting SG 1.095

#7 WineThief

WineThief

    Hooked on WinePress.US

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3021 posts
  • Location:Westminster, Colorado
  • Interests:Wine Making.. :)

Posted 22 August 2005 - 02:45 PM

I agree completely with Lush. Freezing the berries really helps. Put them in a straining bag. The seeds do not make any difference as long as you dont crush or break them.. The are really hard and hard to break, just don't use a hammer or 2x4 or anything like that.. You really do need to remove any stems from the berries as they will produce a bitter flavor to the wine. (The stems are a pain in the butt to remove one by one, but it has to be done.)

I have 40 lbs of this years chokecherries in the freezer and will be starting my batch soon. Here is my recipe for chokecherry..

CHOKECHERRY DELIGHT WINE This is for a ONE GALLON BATCH, to make larger batches multiply everything except yeast by number of gallons you want to make.

2.5 to 3 lbs ripe chokecherries
1 can (11oz) Old Orchard Frozen 100% Apple/Cherry juice
1.75 lbs granulated sugar Starting SG 1.080 - 1.095
1 tsp acid blend (or test and add acid to .60TA)
tsp pectic enzyme
Water to 1 gallon
1 crushed Campden tablet
1 tsp yeast nutrient
wine yeast - Premier Cuvee
Later:
1 crushed campden
tsp Potassium Sorbate

METHOD:
1.Destem and sort berries, discarding any bruised fruit. Put fruit in the freezer for approx five days. Freezing them will help release the juice in the berries. You do not have to destone chokecherries, just don't crush or break the pits. Breaking the pits even a small amout can produce a more than normal bitter flavor in the wine.

2. Put thawed berries in fine nylon straining bag, tie the top and place in primary. Use gloved hands or large potato masher to crush the chokecherries being very careful to only crush the berries and not break any of the pits.

3. Put 1/2 gallon of water on to boil. Once boiling stir in the sugar and dissolve completely, then remove from burner and pour over the chokecherries in the primary.

4. Cover primary and wait 2-3 hours to set the color, then add the Old Orchard juice if using it and the rest of the water. Then allow it to sit till cool. The liquid level should equal about 2 to 3 cups above the 1 gallon mark on your fermenter to make up for the berries and bag.

5. When cooled to room temp stir in all remaining ingredients except pectic enzyme and yeast. Take an SG reading and confirm it is between 1.080 1.095. If it requires adjustment then adjust by either adding sugar syrup, or water. If you have an acid test kit, test must and adjust acid to .60 TA. Cover and leave for 12 hours.

6. After the 12 hours add the pectic enzyme, recover and leave another 12 hours.

7. After the second 12 hours open primary and sprinkle the yeast on top of the must and recover.

8. Push the bag of fruit under the liquid 2 twice daily to extract juice and to keep the fruit wet.

9. When S.G. drops to 1.010 (4-7 days), remove bag of fruit pulp and squeezing gently, then discard fruit. Then siphon liquor into secondary carboy, fit airlock and let sit for 2-4 weeks to finish fermentation.

10. When all fermentation is complete, rack off of sediment into a clean sanitized carboy. Stir in 1 crushed campden tablet and tsp of Potassium Sorbate per gallon to stabilize. Stir vigorously for 3-4 minutes to dissipate CO2, then install airlock.

11. To aid clearing, rack again in 2 months and continue racking every 2 to 3 months until wine is completely clear. One month before bottling stir in 1 crushed campden tablet.

12. If desired, after 3-4 months, you may fine with sparkloid or SuperKleer to promote faster clearing for early bottling, or you can filter this wine to produce a brillant wine clear wine.

NOTE:
Some may prefer this wine dry, but most will enjoy it sweetened back slightly. To sweeten at bottling: Add can (5 ozs) of Old Orchard Apple/Cherry frozen concentrate to increase fruit flavor. Then stir in approx 1/4lbs of sugar directly into the wine until completly dissolved. Taste the wine, if it is not sweet enough add more sugar a little at a time until you reach the desired level of sweetness reinstall the airlock and let sit for 30 days racking one more time before bottling. (This is a good time to add the one crushed campden per gallon before bottling as mentioned above)

Bottle in dark bottles to preserve color, or store clear bottles in dark place. This wine is best if left to Age 9-12 months.

Edited by WineThief, 04 March 2008 - 05:31 PM.

In the immortal words of Ben Franklin,
"WINE IS A CONSTANT REMINDER THAT GOD LOVES US AND LOVES TO SEE US HAPPY"
Terry Neve

#8 Lush

Lush

    Wine Padawan

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 582 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Iraq via Montana
  • Interests:Let's go fishin'!<br />Makin' wine in some shape or form since 1984.

Posted 22 August 2005 - 04:56 PM

Forgot to add that chokecherries are very tannic. This wine needs a year to age as well.

#9 Vinmaker

Vinmaker

    Winemaker

  • WinePress.US Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 7129 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Massachusetts, USA

Posted 22 August 2005 - 06:20 PM

QUOTE (tcampbell @ Aug 22 2005, 10:29 AM)
I don't know about you, but I've never seen a chokecherry de-stoner and I sure don't have time to de-stone 99 gazillion chokecherries by hand.



I agree. How would one do this?

Happily Winemaking.

Waiting for the 2013 Harvest!


#10 neilt

neilt

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 182 posts
  • Location:MB, Canada

Posted 23 August 2005 - 09:16 AM

Thanks guys! Not only did you answer my questions (I'm too lazy to destone all those berries), I've got some recipes to refer to.
I freeze most of the fruit that I ferment, now. I found out by accident how much easier it is to extract the juice.
No bumper crop here, so I am only making 1 gallon. I'll be using 2.5 lbs of berries.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users