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Black Locust Honey Wine


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#1 Psyguy

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 10:10 AM

I was at the Vintage Ohio Wine Festival in NE Ohio this past weekend, and had the opportunity to taste many wonderful (and some so-so to not-so-wonderful) wines.

One of the meads that I tasted was made from Black Locust Honey. The dude pouring it was really gung-ho about the fact that it came from black locust honey. However, when I tasted it, it had a strong vegetative flavor at the front. It kind of reminded me of being in an enclosed greenhouse and breathing in - you get that "greenery/earthy" flavor in your mouth.

The honey itself did not have this flavor (or if it did, it was masked by the sweetness of the honey). Is this typical for mead from black locust honey?
If I ever get a break from work - at home and at work - I just might get some wine made.
-Jevin

#2 ScottS

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 10:30 AM

No idea. Black locust seems to be a pretty rare honey, I've never seen it for sale in any of the local or online places I frequent.

#3 kilroy

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 04:49 PM

Black Locust Honey?

as in Black Locust - The Bug? or is there a plant called the Black Locust ?

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#4 LeChaim

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Posted 09 August 2005 - 01:18 AM

Andrew, some species of trees are called Locust. Carob has been called Locust.

Psyguy, I can tell you that an exotic honey gets some mazers very excited (I'm one wink.gif ). It can be tempting to show off a mead that nobody else has. However, some honeys, and I've read that buckwheat honey is one such, have strong unique flavors that can be described in strange terms such as "barnyard". I have never worked with buckwheat honey because it's not available here, but from what I read, most people mix it with a larger proportion of lighter honeys. It sounds like this person is not yet very skillful in his mead-making - maybe he brought out that bottle too soon (for most meads take at least a year to mature, and two is better), or maybe his honey is one of those powerful ones.

Miriam
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#5 breumyster

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Posted 09 August 2005 - 06:32 AM

There are two common species of locust here in the States, black locust and honey locust. Either one provides excellent nectar for bees.

Black locust is toxic, but I don't know if that extends to the nectar or not. It's great wood to use in place of treated lumber due to the toxins, which make it rot resistant, and it will last just about as long as treated wood or cedar. People in this part of the country use it for fence posts.

The black locust honey I've tried had a musky, smoky, kind of grassy flavor. Honey locust is a little lighter and has a more floral taste (at least to me) but still has the grassy overtones. I'm not sure I would use either of them for a varietal mead. Maybe a small amount in a blend for the novelty value.

Bart

#6 Psyguy

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Posted 09 August 2005 - 06:51 AM

The guy from the winery said that the black locust honey is only produced (collected?) by the bees for about two weeks during the year. So I think you are right in that aspect, Miriam - it's a more exotic honey that they like to show off in their mead.

Good point about it being young and perhaps showing some green flavors. I should have grabbed a bottle (I know...I didn't - I was busy picking up other wines 11doh.gif ) and let it keep for a year before trying it again.
If I ever get a break from work - at home and at work - I just might get some wine made.
-Jevin




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