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Wine Is Better After Breathing


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#1 skipdonohue

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 03:40 PM

Of course I know wine needs to breathe and open up… but I have been running into this same issue for a coupe years now…  My reds are pH adjusted, fermented in good temp ranges,  go through malo, sulphited, oaked with chips and are aged for min of 1 year in a glass demi… but whenever i open a bottle, pour a glass and sip it, i get an initial 'zippy' taste to it, then after 5-10 mins in the glass, the wine is smooth as silk and tastes great, ...if i only drink half a bottle, then next day the other half is even better tasting, i want my bottled product to taste like this 15 minute breathing time..

i thought all the CO2 should have been dissapated through rackings and a years worth of aging..  yous think this is trapped CO2, and thats why its tastes smooth after being in an open glass?  what can i do to my current batch of 2011 Cab that is having this same issue? I have a full demi still aging and also just bottled a demi… would this issue go away if I went over to a barrel, which I plan on doin this fall..  thanks



#2 bassmannate

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 04:44 PM

You'd be surprised at how much big reds can benefit from breathing for as long as you describe.

#3 Howie

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 04:54 PM

Young wines (<5 years old) are often decanted to introduce air to the wine so they open up quicker.  Old wines, on the other hand (>20 years old) are often stood up for several days before opening and decanted before serving to remove the sediment.


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#4 skipdonohue

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 06:23 PM

so is everyone assuming that this is trapped CO2 causing this?



#5 glenn1959

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 06:42 PM

Do you test that malo is complete? Almost sounds like you have natural mlf happening in the bottle, which gives you the fiz which then dissipates once the bottle is opened and poured.

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#6 Howie

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 06:43 PM

If you get a layer of very small bubbles to form on the surface, then it is CO2.  Otherwise, the wine is simply opening up after being exposed to air.


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#7 bassmannate

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 05:33 AM

The zippy taste could be a number of things that are coming off the wine after sitting for a while as well.

#8 Howie

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 05:51 AM

The following is a typical Wine Tasting Note (WTN) posted by a genuine wine geek on the Wine Lovers Page for a 2 1/2 year old Bordeaux (QPR = Quality Price Ratio = good value) that illustrates the point I was making.

 

 

WTN: 2010 Hourtin-Ducasse (Haut Medoc) QPR

Deep ruby color, edging into the purple realm. I opened the wine when i got home from work, and just took a sip to check it. Quite tight, and not showing much. Two hours later in the open bottle the wine had started to transform a bit, filling out in the mid-palate, and gaining some deep cassis style fruit. Not too much wood here, such that the fruit plays the center role. No hint of over ripeness, and in fact something that resembles Bordeaux that I used to buy 15 years ago. It really reminded me of a 1998 from a higher tier producer. The tannins are not quite as pronounced as in that vintage, and I would not be holding this wine for 20 years to wait for maturity, but I definitely see a mid-term future for this bottling over the next 10-15 years of its life. Nice value for $20.

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#9 Green Zeus

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:40 AM

You might try buying an aireator for your wines.  We recently bought one in order to open up our Pinot Noir more.  It is definitely much better after going thru the aireator and is immediate instead of having to swirl your glass around for 10 minutes before the wine opens up fully.



#10 dagobob

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:46 AM

I have the same experiences as you, and I follow nearly identical procedures. I even made a similiar post about a year ago.Not much we can do, it seems to be the nature of some red wines. I did find that adding Biolees (at slightly higher than reccommended dose) helps.


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#11 WineMan2008

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 06:57 AM

Of course I know wine needs to breathe and open up… but I have been running into this same issue for a coupe years now…  My reds are pH adjusted, fermented in good temp ranges,  go through malo, sulphited, oaked with chips and are aged for min of 1 year in a glass demi… but whenever i open a bottle, pour a glass and sip it, i get an initial 'zippy' taste to it, then after 5-10 mins in the glass, the wine is smooth as silk and tastes great, ...if i only drink half a bottle, then next day the other half is even better tasting, i want my bottled product to taste like this 15 minute breathing time..
i thought all the CO2 should have been dissapated through rackings and a years worth of aging..  yous think this is trapped CO2, and thats why its tastes smooth after being in an open glass?  what can i do to my current batch of 2011 Cab that is having this same issue? I have a full demi still aging and also just bottled a demi… would this issue go away if I went over to a barrel, which I plan on doin this fall..  thanks

I find that my red wines taste a lot better the next day after resting in the bottle about 3/4 full,

Steve

#12 skipdonohue

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 09:27 AM

I have the same experiences as you, and I follow nearly identical procedures. I even made a similiar post about a year ago.Not much we can do, it seems to be the nature of some red wines. I did find that adding Biolees (at slightly higher than reccommended dose) helps.

 

Do you use glass or a barrel, Im switchin over to barrels in Fall, Im anticipating that micro oxidation will rectify this issue, hopefully



#13 ld6504

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 09:42 AM

Try a Vinturi wine aerator (http://www.vinturi.com/) ...it really opens up the wine, particularly when the wine is young.



#14 freshgrapes

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 06:10 PM

I believe that the primary source of the extreme noticeability of the problem is the reductive process associated with maturing in glass, as compared to barrel-maturing or flextank-maturing, both of which allow micro-oxygenation in an aerative process.  Still, many barreled wines, especially young, big reds as noted, also benefit from being decanted for at least an hour or two.

 

I went to a flextank for some of my wine partly due to this issue, and notice it virtually every time I open a bottle of my red wine matured in carboys.  If I'm in a hurry to drink wine after opening a bottle, I pour through an aerator and swirl regularly in the glass.  I bought a second decanter recently for when I have guests.



#15 skipdonohue

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 06:18 PM

I believe that the primary source of the extreme noticeability of the problem is the reductive process associated with maturing in glass, as compared to barrel-maturing or flextank-maturing, both of which allow micro-oxygenation in an aerative process.  Still, many barreled wines, especially young, big reds as noted, also benefit from being decanted for at least an hour or two.
 
I went to a flextank for some of my wine partly due to this issue, and notice it virtually every time I open a bottle of my red wine matured in carboys.  If I'm in a hurry to drink wine after opening a bottle, I pour through an aerator and swirl regularly in the glass.  I bought a second decanter recently for when I have guests.



Thanks, this is my assumption also.. Will know for sure soon, makin the switch to barrels this month!




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