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Lab And Glassware Cleaning


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#16 Kabang

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Posted 09 February 2012 - 10:47 AM

I think it matters if you are cleaning your labware to store or are cleaning for use. In one book I read it recommended cleaning and rinsing with SO2 solution and then storing without rinsing. The remaining SO2 protecting during storage. Then I repeat before use, but rinse with puified water - RO water fulfilling that requirement. My problem is the whole process makes a ginormous mess. I people would offer their insights on the best way to keep the water fight mayhem to a minimum.
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#17 Tomer1

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Posted 09 February 2012 - 11:20 AM

Why would you care about chlorine or contamination (sanitazing with so2) in your testing glassware anyhow?

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#18 Kabang

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Posted 09 February 2012 - 11:53 AM

Why would you care about chlorine or contamination (sanitazing with so2) in your testing glassware anyhow?



I idea in the book was that the residual SO2 after the glassware dried would inhibit bacterial grow during storage.
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#19 Scott^S

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Posted 09 February 2012 - 07:24 PM

Be careful with using SO2, I put my beakers in a cork-a-dork type container with SO2 and I now have a bunch of beakers with no marking on them. The fumes softened the writing up and it wiped right off. One of my leasons learned about the power of SO2 fumes.
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#20 foleysteven

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Posted 09 February 2012 - 08:49 PM



I idea in the book was that the residual SO2 after the glassware dried would inhibit bacterial grow during storage.


I have been reading the posts on the site for a few months now with much interest, the site has been very enlightening, thanks.

This topic is close to my professional bailiwick. If you are worried about bacterial growth during storage of laboratory glassware, you cover the tops of beakers and flasks and wrap glass pipets with aluminum foil and bake in a 340 F oven for about an hour. This should sterilize the glassware and the foil keeps the insides of the beakers/ flasks and the wrapped pipets sterile until needed. Before baking make sure the glassware is well rinsed with good quality water to remove any residual soap or other chemicals that may interfere with future assays. This is how we handle glassware in my research lab at work.

#21 Jdog

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 11:30 AM

Why is anyone worried about having sterile glassware for laboratory testing? Clean it, rinse it and dry it. Nothing grows in the absence of water. If your working in a biology lab doing cell culture, you need sterile glassware, for chemical testing, no. I run a QC lab with 50 chemists and can tell you that no lab doing chemical analyses sterilizes their glassware. It just not necessary.

#22 foleysteven

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 07:06 AM

Jdog you are correct that the glassware used for chemical testing does not need to be sterile. However the process of fermentation is yeast cell culture and MLF bacterial cell culture and it is best not to introduce contaminating organisms, thus the pipet or other tool used to draw up the analytical wine/juice sample from your fermenter or carboy should be well sanitized or sterile because many microorganisms can survive for extended periods of time in absence of water.

#23 Jdog

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 09:45 AM

Absolutely, bugs can survive for a long time on the surface but making wine is not a sterile process. The number of organisms you introduce into you wine by sticking a clean dry pipett into it is no more than what falls into it every time you open the container. I just think people get carried away with things and going to extreme measures that aren't important. Keep control of your so2 levels and you should be fine.

#24 Joe_Sallo

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 02:55 PM

I used to work with materials science types and we cleaned our glassware with Alconox and rinsed 3 times, that is what I do and have never had an issue. Alconox has gotten expensive but a box lasts us several years and we use it to clean everything but barrels. I clean stuff as soon as I empty it.

Used bottles get rinsed and held up toward a light to see if anything is growing in them before washing; if there is a glob of mold I hit that with a 10% bleach solution before washing. That seems to work, we've never had an issue there either.

I use tap water for rinsing everything.

#25 rpage53

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Posted 13 February 2012 - 02:58 AM

No one has mentioned that the most useful ingredient is elbow grease. A good detergent and a scrub brush is the best way to clean glassware. If you aren't growing cultures you don't need to worry about sterility. I have spent many delightful hours waiting for the autoclave but never around the winery. People tend to forget that alcohol and acid are excellent antimicrobials.

Rick.




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