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Muscat/ Muscado/ Muscadine


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#1 Mauro

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Posted 10 September 2011 - 07:28 PM

Moscat/ Moscato/ Muscadine, are these the same wine/grapes ?

I have some Muscat Juice coming in October.

When I ferment it to 1.000 or lower, will it still have that nice fruity sweet taste ?

Do I have to add sugar before bottling ?

If I ferment it to dry, how can it taste sweeet unless I add sugar ?

Thanks ! Mauro
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#2 Danny Rappleyea

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Posted 10 September 2011 - 08:08 PM

Muscat and Muscadine are completely different grapes altogether. The muscadine type grapes are pretty common here in NC.

The Muscat grapes are (I believe) what is used to make a Moscato wine. At least, I've made a Moscato type wine from Muscat grapes. There are different types of Muscat grapes (Canelli and Orange Muscat come to mind) that I've heard are rather different varieties themselves.

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#3 gregmg

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Posted 10 September 2011 - 08:57 PM

I have a few Muscat vines and I use the grapes in my white blend. Muscat produces a lot of aromatics and flavor. A cooler ferment (55 to 65 degrees, depending on yeast strain) will help preserve the aroma and flavor. No oak is called for with Muscat; the vanilla and wood notes would compete with the fruit. Muscat is nice sweet, dry, or bubbly. You can add sugar after fermentation is complete. This is frequently called "backsweetening", although some take issue with that word. There is a risk of fermentation picking back up again. There are several ways to address this. The common approach is to stabilize the wine with sorbate before adding the sugar. I prefer to use a yeast with a low alcohol tolerance, then add sugar after it's had several months to settle. I always give a wine an extra long time to bulk age when adding sugar like this. If it wants to ferment further, I'd rather have it do it under an airlock than under a cork.

#4 Tomer1

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 06:56 AM

Muscat can be made in an oxidative style and barreled in used barrels.
This style make very nice sweet late harvest and dry wines but today this style is very much dead because of the demand for new world style whites = intensly fresh fruity aromatics and not a hint of oxydation or yellow tint.
Thats why these wines are bottled soon after fermentation by means of filtration or certrifuge to preserve these aromatics and why I suggest that you dont age them for an extended time if thats the style your after.
Sorbate and high free so2 should make the wine stable enough to bottle young,
Degassing and fining agents can help the wine clear alot faster.

In any case I suggest you hit the wine strong with so2 post fermentation to prevent any kind of oxidation and lose of aromatics,even over sulfiting which will sort it self (by time and racking) once your ready to bottle.

Cool fermentation is a good advice,cotes de blanc is a strong choice if you want to have some residual sugar left. When your aproaching your zone drop the fermentation to below 10c, near freezing is even better.
My advice may or may not be backed by actually personal expirience and should be treated as such. :)

#5 red_feet

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 05:52 PM

This year I'm planning on doing a blend of Muscat with a saignee of Foch to produce a rose. Any pointers?

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#6 Juniper Hill

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 08:27 AM

Ken,

I did this with a Baco saigneé last year. Turned out great. The muscat really dominated, though, so start out with bench trials and small serial additions of muscat.

Cheers.

Neil

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#7 Juniper Hill

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 08:30 AM

Last year I reserved (froze) 10% juice from my Muscat and have since used it to backsweeten the main Muscat batch. The wine is fantastic. Currently cold stabilizing and will be bottled in a couple of weeks.

Juniper Hill Cellars - Vinifera, Hybrid and Mead Wines

Juniper Hill Brewery - All Grain since 2012

 

Fermenting:

Elderflower Wine

Elderflower Metheglyn

Cream Ale

 

Currently Growing:

Grapes, Elderberries, Haskap, Hops


#8 red_feet

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 04:45 PM

Neil,
Thanks for the input. I will reserve enough Foch to bring my Muscat to a full carboy. Any Foch left over I can return to the main Foch batch. I've ordered one bushel of Muscat Otonel and 6 bushels of Foch.
I haven't had Muscat wine for many years, but I didn't mind its dominant flavor.

Ken wave.gif
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