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Making An Amarone


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#16 bzac

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 03:39 PM

Looking at my notes I also used enzymes to extract the most out of the grapes and optired and vr supra in the primary.
Above all relax , it's winemaking ,it's not supposed to be stressfull . It's not sky diving.

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#17 George_A

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 12:45 PM

I wouldn't recommend using a dehydrator . Drying on racks in a well-ventilated area gives better results. http://www.domainege...technology.html

#18 Tomer1

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 03:45 PM

I'l be expirimenting with a 100lbs of cab this year. Will likely do it in plastic crates and use a fan to force air if humidity gets too high. if it works It will likely be used for a ripasso style wine rather then amarone as our cab already comes in at 14%-14.5% PA and it will be really hard to ferment dry after 40%-50% lost of water.
My advice may or may not be backed by actually personal expirience and should be treated as such. :)

#19 bzac

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 03:57 PM

I would like to do the rack method but it takes a lot of room and fruit flies are a menace in this climate .
I don't think I could do it without fly issues.

Itshard enough keeping them out of the wine

Also the humidity in Vancouver is about 80 -100 percent in the autumn and winter , Grapes would go moldy before they dried.
Above all relax , it's winemaking ,it's not supposed to be stressfull . It's not sky diving.

Zac Brown

#20 George_A

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 05:24 PM

You also can use an inexpensive rope instead of the racks and add fly screen s on windows ( from my experience, the flies do not like raisiny grapes, if the skin is intact) Posted Image

#21 rpage53

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 11:28 PM

It really depends on your climate. I could hang grapes for months and they'd never dry here and I suspect Seaside NJ is similar. Its the peak of the summer and I have 80% humidity on the beautiful BC coast. Even a dehydrator takes a long time and by the fall the fruit flies are relentless.

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#22 Wade's Wines

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 05:58 AM

Our humidity is the same way. I think it would take a dehydrator here.
I once built a food dehydrator in Eastern Oregon, high desert, that used one light bulb in the bottom just to help move the air. The dehydrator was 5' tall, 3' wide, 2' deep and full of shelves with window screen. It would dry anything in 24 hours, even if it was full.
Here in Tennessee, I built one that should have been far more effecient. It had three 100 watt bulbs in the bottom, not enough. So I added a fan to the top pulling air through. Then of the dozen shelves it would dry one. Ended up buying a store-bought one and it takes 48 hours to dry grapes to raisins if it's not fully loaded. Humidity is a huge factor.
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#23 Tomer1

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 09:22 AM

You can sun dry them on your roof top, its about 3 times faster (30-40 days instead of 100-120 to get to 35-50% moisture reduction). But flavor and aroma would obviously be a bit different. A bit cooked perhpas but if your only using the dried grapes as part of your "final blend" I think the fruitiness of the "regular wine" will mask it.
My advice may or may not be backed by actually personal expirience and should be treated as such. :)

#24 Wade's Wines

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 10:57 AM

You can sun dry them on your roof top, its about 3 times faster (30-40 days instead of 100-120 to get to 35-50% moisture reduction).

Here it would rain on them several times in 30-40 days, and the birds would have eaten them all in 3 to 5 days. Hard to dry fruit in rain.
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#25 Tomer1

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Posted 10 August 2012 - 02:43 PM

Yeah, thats why israel is so great for dessert wines but unfortunatly its hardly produced. We only get the the first rainfall in late November-mid december.

You can put a net on top of the grapes to protect from insects and birds. build a net tent :)
To my understanding the skins harden in the first few days and then its only rot or botritis which concerns you (as it produces laccase which is an enzyme capable of ruining the red color of your wine).
My advice may or may not be backed by actually personal expirience and should be treated as such. :)

#26 Weaselboys

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 01:24 PM

Tomer,
Just seen this thread again.
I ended up dehydrating 2 lugs each of Cabernet and Merlot, (wanted to go with Petit Syrah but it was all I could get at the time).
That gave me about 8 gallons of semi-raisins (didn't dehydrate all the way to raisins).
I added them to three 6 gallon pails of Italian Amarone juice which gave me 19 gallons of finished wine.
I ran into one problem, I couldn't get it to ferment to 0. The juice started at about 25 brix but I know it was higher because of the raisins. Wasn't sure how to calculate them in.
It ended at about 1%RS, a little sweet. It's been sitting in a new Vadai 14 gallon barrel and a carboy since June.
I just tried it the other day at my fall crushing with 6 other guys I make wine with, we all loved it.
Looks like it will turn out excellent in another year or two. too bad your aren't closer I'd send you a bottle.
Mike
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#27 Tomer1

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 02:11 PM

Mike did you try re-inoculating with a bayanus strain? (perhaps Uvaferm 43\pro restart or 1118)

I visited a winery in malta this summer producing this style of wine and they said they often need to reinoculate to achive low residual sugar when they arent aiming for a dessert wine.

Unfortunatly (or not) I decided to start my balsamic vinegar project this vintage and my grape budget was maxed out on that so maybe next year...
My advice may or may not be backed by actually personal expirience and should be treated as such. :)

#28 Weaselboys

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 06:20 AM

Yes, I I did a restart with EC1118.
I racked it on day 14 to carboys and and it was going slow, was at 3.82 brix.
It stopped at .77 brix, after malolactic. 136 days in it was racked & KMETA'd and again at day 177.
Day 232 it was KMETA'd and put in a barrel. I will take it out in March around day 500 and bottle.
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#29 Tomer1

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 06:50 AM

Thats not bad. its not THAT sweet... slightly off dry as many amarone's are.
I made some ripasso from the pressed syrah skins (used for vinegar must) with merlot. I almost doubled the amount of solids and gain about 1-1.5% abv. so its peaking at 15.5% or so. I think its done with MLF and it tastes terrific. dry @ -2 brix yet has huge body and sweetness.
My advice may or may not be backed by actually personal expirience and should be treated as such. :)




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