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Elderberry Crop Wiped Out


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#1 WVMountaineerJack

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 01:29 AM

Our elderberry crop has been almost all wiped out this spring from some disease. We had a long rainy spring followed by a nice heat wave, it looked like we were going to get lots of flowers and then this showed up. More pics on our website at http://www.oatmealjack.com/Elderberries/ElderberriesBugs . If anyone has a guess let me know, possibly Verticillium wilt? Cracked in WV

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#2 Rich59

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 12:23 PM

Hi Cracked,

Long time no commune!

Over in the UK I have found S. Nigra sensitive to heat waves. One hot dry summer I lost all the leaves on all my bushes.

I'm guessing it might be the heat wave picking off tender growth?

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#3 deb_rn

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 04:35 PM

OMG....

I feel bad for you!! Fortunately, they are hard to fully kill and should be back strong next year.

What about your older berries? Are they affected too?

Debbie
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#4 DrunkSkunk

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 07:13 PM

I've had some leaf clusters dry up but we are in a serious drought. Mostly mine are loaded with berries. I would cut that portion off and examine it closely for some type of borer or something. Typically I'd expect v. wilt to affect the leaves also. Your foliage looks good.

#5 Paul Williams

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 07:51 PM

I'm not that far from Baton Rouge and Yes, we have been in a serious drought. I have both wild elderberries that I have transplanted a few years ago and I also have some hybrids planted in another area. The hybrids are drip irrigated and doing great. In fact, I actually harvested a few ripe ones June 14 and I can't ever remember getting any this early before. The wild ones have sections that wilt every other day and I have to water them with the hose and that pulls them back. All of the fruit looks okay. Bore problems cause the entire limb along with the foleage to die. The foleage n Cracked Corks plants look okay but the fruit is gone???? I have never seen that happen. I would get someone from the extension department out to take a look. I hope Debie is right and they come back strong next year. What a bummer!!!!!!
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#6 WVMountaineerJack

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 08:28 PM

Hi RIch, how are the allotments going? I did have some Nigras, multiple stems as thick as a bat, they didnt even leaf out this year and they are usually the first, none of our Goldberre made it either. I did mow down this patch to the ground last winter as the bushes havent been trimmed since 2008, just bushhogged the whole plot except for the nigras. Leaves are mostlly ok, its going to be rainy and cloudy next week so it will probablly spread if its a disease or lessen if its just an ealy heat but they have taken much worse heat than this earlyon. Crackedcork in WV

Hi Cracked,

Long time no commune!

Over in the UK I have found S. Nigra sensitive to heat waves. One hot dry summer I lost all the leaves on all my bushes.

I'm guessing it might be the heat wave picking off tender growth?

Rich



#7 WVMountaineerJack

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 08:31 PM

Deb, some of tthe older bushes that did get pruned to the ground hot hit hard also, my wyldewoods didnt get cut at all and their flowerbuds are all black and shriveled up while some other patches havent been affected. No not much can kill them but I dont want to find out what will!! CC

OMG....

I feel bad for you!! Fortunately, they are hard to fully kill and should be back strong next year.

What about your older berries? Are they affected too?

Debbie



#8 WVMountaineerJack

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 08:33 PM

DS, I looked for borers but saw none, some of the flowerhead are very small and just black at teh bottom. There are some sawfly larvae eating on the leaves but they eat what they bite and would eat the flowers not just snip themmm and ignore them. CC

I've had some leaf clusters dry up but we are in a serious drought. Mostly mine are loaded with berries. I would cut that portion off and examine it closely for some type of borer or something. Typically I'd expect v. wilt to affect the leaves also. Your foliage looks good.



#9 WVMountaineerJack

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Posted 17 June 2011 - 08:36 PM

You guys are picking already, we just started to get some raspberries, I hope to have a good year on them with just enough elders to use to add a little color t his year. I might have to teach them what an elderberry is first :):) CC

I'm not that far from Baton Rouge and Yes, we have been in a serious drought. I have both wild elderberries that I have transplanted a few years ago and I also have some hybrids planted in another area. The hybrids are drip irrigated and doing great. In fact, I actually harvested a few ripe ones June 14 and I can't ever remember getting any this early before. The wild ones have sections that wilt every other day and I have to water them with the hose and that pulls them back. All of the fruit looks okay. Bore problems cause the entire limb along with the foleage to die. The foleage n Cracked Corks plants look okay but the fruit is gone???? I have never seen that happen. I would get someone from the extension department out to take a look. I hope Debie is right and they come back strong next year. What a bummer!!!!!!



#10 DrunkSkunk

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 04:45 AM

I'm not even close to picking elders yet. I am smack dab in the middle of the flowers falling off and the fruit setting. I have watered minimally, typically on my way to the muscadine vines with the hose I will stop for a few minutes and give them a drink. I have never purchased any elderberry plants. All the plants I have started from a few a friend dug up that wouldn't go away. The seeds were apparently deposited by birds while "resting" in his fig tree. Birds have since help spread them to a few places in my yard. Only 1 of those places have I allowed.

The only elders I have entertained purchasing are the variety that has larger berries. I'd still have to fight the birds for them but I'd like to have a few bushes. Having the birds around have their advantages. The past few years I have had almost no BUGS in my garden. A few tomatoes ravaged but that is a small price to pay for pest control.

I have read that you can cut elders back to the ground each year but I only did that after Hurricane Gustave snapped them all about 1 foot from the ground. I'm shocked and glad to see you bush hogged yours. I am going to make a few changes around here and while the bushes can remain it would be nice to be able to work and not have to fight them. I'll saw them off this year, get the project done and look forward to next year.

Keep us posted if you find out what hit your clusters like that. That's brutal!

#11 BobF

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 07:38 AM

Cracked -

This excerpt from the Mountain Grove PDF implies that the eriophyid mite could be the problem. Infortunately, it doesn't say what to do about it.
http://www.fruit.cor...rrymissouri.pdf

Elderberry Pests

While elderberries are relatively pest resistant, we have noted several potential problems in our

plantings. An unidentified stem borer causes wilting and dieback of new shoots in April and May

in the Mountain Grove plantings. Larvae of a sawfly have defoliated plants at the Mount Vernon

site. The adult elder borer, also known as the elderberry longhorned beetle, has been collected at

both the Mount Vernon and Mountain Grove sites. The larva of this spectacular beetle bores into

the woody parts of the plant. Stink bugs are routinely noted on ripe panicles, but the amount of

damage is unknown. A potentially damaging pest is the eriophyid mite, present at both the

Mountain Grove and the Mount Vernon sites. This mite causes cupping and crinkling of the

foliage, and can cause abortion of florets and young fruit. The economic impact of this pest is

unknown. Fall webworms were also noted in the Mount Vernon planting. An unidentified leaf

spot disease, which usually is noted in midsummer, can cause premature leaf drop and

occasionally defoliation. Birds of several species will feed on elderberry fruit; those selections with

pendulous panicles appear to be less attractive to birds.



#12 deb_rn

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 08:31 AM

As I walked around my small yard last night, I noticed what looks like aphids on my cherry tree. It's just at some of the tips. I don't spray or anything. I've never needed to!! What a weird year!

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#13 Wade's Wines

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 09:17 AM

Stylet oil or probably neem oil will kill them. Or ladybugs. All classified as organic.
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#14 WVMountaineerJack

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 05:01 PM

Bob, I think I have all of them except the longhorned beetle, sawflies have stripped the leaves from a separate patch of elders beside our house, but we have orioles hunting in there, we also have bees so I cant spray anything. I dont think its mites as there is no webbing or signs of mites, its more like they just rot off. Cracked

Cracked -

This excerpt from the Mountain Grove PDF implies that the eriophyid mite could be the problem. Infortunately, it doesn't say what to do about it.
http://www.fruit.cor...rrymissouri.pdf

Elderberry Pests

While elderberries are relatively pest resistant, we have noted several potential problems in our

plantings. An unidentified stem borer causes wilting and dieback of new shoots in April and May

in the Mountain Grove plantings. Larvae of a sawfly have defoliated plants at the Mount Vernon

site. The adult elder borer, also known as the elderberry longhorned beetle, has been collected at

both the Mount Vernon and Mountain Grove sites. The larva of this spectacular beetle bores into

the woody parts of the plant. Stink bugs are routinely noted on ripe panicles, but the amount of

damage is unknown. A potentially damaging pest is the eriophyid mite, present at both the

Mountain Grove and the Mount Vernon sites. This mite causes cupping and crinkling of the

foliage, and can cause abortion of florets and young fruit. The economic impact of this pest is

unknown. Fall webworms were also noted in the Mount Vernon planting. An unidentified leaf

spot disease, which usually is noted in midsummer, can cause premature leaf drop and

occasionally defoliation. Birds of several species will feed on elderberry fruit; those selections with

pendulous panicles appear to be less attractive to birds.




#15 TwinMaples

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 06:30 AM

I'm getting on here late, but CrackedCork, I'm sorry to hear about your elderberries. That is a big-time bummer!

Hopefully you can find the "cure" for what is hurting them.

I guess I've been lucky. In the few years I've grown elderberries, I've had no little pests. Except for seeing a bird in the elderberry bush once or twice, they apparently find more appealing food elsewhere.

Jim




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