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Pvc Sausage Stuffer


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#1 ScottNC

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 07:18 AM

After an search of some internet bbq/food forums I found several postings of affordable, homemade PVC sausage stuffers. Most were powered by the domestic water supply. Several had photo essays and even a video or two....but no list of the parts used. Lowe's, Home Depot and the McMaster-Carr catalog have not provided answers.

The diameter and length are up to the builder and his volume requirements. The use of a water powered piston is straight forward. The adaption of stuffing cones is subject to the requirements of what you may already have on hand or have access to. My question is what to do to seal the ends of the pipe. The best looking set-ups have a bolt together flange glued or screwed to the ends that allow easy refilling and clean up. I have been unable to locate such flanges for reasonable cost, ditto sheets of PVC suitable for fabricating custom end caps. A store bought stuffer looks cheaper than a pair of $50 flanges! Less desirable to me is the glue on threaded adapter and a screw-in plug like a drain clean-out would use.

Have any of you built such a thing?

#2 Howie

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 08:17 AM

Have any of you built such a thing?

No. I bought http://www.cabelas.c...%3Bcat104364180]
Cabela's Heavy-Duty Meat Grinder when it was on sale for $70.

Howie Hart

#3 Tomer1

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 09:00 AM

Essentially you just need a tube (accual stuffer) glued to a thin spacer (with the tube portion drilled out so it can let meat pass through) slightly smaller then the diameter (so you dont interupt the threads) of the grinder which you will fit before the outer locking ring.

If I were into tatoos... I would tatoo some grapes on my forarm. :P


#4 TwinMaples

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 09:50 AM

No, I haven't either, but your project piqued my curiosity. I googled for a while, and had the same results as you: no parts list. wallbash.gif

You might want to check out this sausage stuffer: Sausage Stuffer (scroll down a bit to see it). I bought my meat cutting knives there, and received fast service from them. Or, if you don't buy, you might see something that will help your design.

If you do make one, many of us here would like to see what you made, how you did it, and...you guessed it: a parts list!!!

Jim




After an search of some internet bbq/food forums I found several postings of affordable, homemade PVC sausage stuffers. Most were powered by the domestic water supply. Several had photo essays and even a video or two....but no list of the parts used. Lowe's, Home Depot and the McMaster-Carr catalog have not provided answers.

The diameter and length are up to the builder and his volume requirements. The use of a water powered piston is straight forward. The adaption of stuffing cones is subject to the requirements of what you may already have on hand or have access to. My question is what to do to seal the ends of the pipe. The best looking set-ups have a bolt together flange glued or screwed to the ends that allow easy refilling and clean up. I have been unable to locate such flanges for reasonable cost, ditto sheets of PVC suitable for fabricating custom end caps. A store bought stuffer looks cheaper than a pair of $50 flanges! Less desirable to me is the glue on threaded adapter and a screw-in plug like a drain clean-out would use.

Have any of you built such a thing?



#5 ScottNC

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 03:21 PM

Since posting this morning I spent some time in Lowe's plumbing dept. Picked up a length of 4" PVC for the body, a 3" cap (fits the 4" pipe I.D. pretty well so should work for the piston once two o-ring grooves are added) and a pair of glue-on, inside threaded collars and screw in plugs for end caps. The threaded plug should be easy to drill and glue in a fitting to hold a delivery tube. Don't plan to adapt to standard stuffer tubes, a length of 1/2" or 3/4" PVC should work fine.

Still undecided how to plumb the water. Pressure and drain ball valves could be mounted in the sides but an accident might mess up the stuffer body. If something clean looking can be installed into the threaded plug that might be better. Will work on that tomorrow.

FWIW I couldn't see how to return the piston without pushing it back down manually until I saw a video of a commercially available stuffer that's built on the same principle. With the discharge end opened just the act of draining the water pulls the piston back to the bottom!

Howie, I have stuffed salami's with a hand crank #32 grinder and a caulk-gun style stuffer....that's why I want something else. Just don't need a stuffer often enough to go out and buy one.

#6 Hammered

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Posted 10 April 2011 - 03:40 PM

Since posting this morning I spent some time in Lowe's plumbing dept. Picked up a length of 4" PVC for the body, a 3" cap (fits the 4" pipe I.D. pretty well so should work for the piston once two o-ring grooves are added) and a pair of glue-on, inside threaded collars and screw in plugs for end caps. The threaded plug should be easy to drill and glue in a fitting to hold a delivery tube. Don't plan to adapt to standard stuffer tubes, a length of 1/2" or 3/4" PVC should work fine.

Still undecided how to plumb the water. Pressure and drain ball valves could be mounted in the sides but an accident might mess up the stuffer body. If something clean looking can be installed into the threaded plug that might be better. Will work on that tomorrow.

FWIW I couldn't see how to return the piston without pushing it back down manually until I saw a video of a commercially available stuffer that's built on the same principle. With the discharge end opened just the act of draining the water pulls the piston back to the bottom!

Howie, I have stuffed salami's with a hand crank #32 grinder and a caulk-gun style stuffer....that's why I want something else. Just don't need a stuffer often enough to go out and buy one.

I wonder if you could put some kind of a threaded cap on the infeed end with a nut epoxied on, then make a threaded rod plunger that you could hook up to a drill to drive the meat through. Just a thought.

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#7 ScottNC

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 07:37 AM

I wonder if you could put some kind of a threaded cap on the infeed end with a nut epoxied on, then make a threaded rod plunger that you could hook up to a drill to drive the meat through. Just a thought.



A threaded rod would probably work just fine but water power is pretty easy to set-up; Two ball valves or something simular with garden hose fittings. Most in the beer/wine hobby already have a faucet that accepts or adapts to a hose making the hook-up pretty straight forward. I'm going to a hardware store today that is locally famous for having hard to find items to see what kind of trick looking fittings for the water they have and a pair of o-rings for the piston.

#8 Doyle

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 09:32 AM

I use a fruit press like the one shown in this ebay ad. Mine belonged to my grandfather so no cost involved. I made a custom stuffing tube out of a piece of 3/4" copper pipe and a sweat fitting from a dieletric union. Keep your eyes open for used Fruit press. They work well and hold 5-8 pounds of meat at a time which is a nice quantity.

#9 ScottNC

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 01:22 PM

Here's a list of parts for one that hasn't stuffed a sausage yet but has survived a "dry" run......

1) 1-length of 4"pvc.
2) 2-4" threaded adapters, the kind that take a normal clean-out plug and slid on outside the pipe.
3) 2-clean-out plugs. One with a big square nut on it and one that's flat and looks like it takes a BIG screwdriver to turn it.
4) 1-3"pvc cap, it needs to have a flat top NOT the rounded top.
5) 2-ball valves and fittings. I used 1/2" pipe. The intake side hooks to a garden hose so you'll need fittings to make that possible and the other can end with a barbed fitting for a length of tubing.
6) 1-compression adapter. The one I used is pvc and has 3/4" male pipe on one end and is sized for 3/4"pvc on the other. The fitting has an o-ringed collar that allows a length of plastic pipe to be held in place mearly by tightening the collar by hand. One with 1/2" all the way to 1" would work fine depending on the size casings you're trying to stuff.

Here's what I did:

Cut the 4" pipe to 2' for no particular reason. Champfer the inside edges generously.

Used a lathe to bore the inside of one of the threaded adapters deeper so it would slide as far over the pipe as the clean-out plug would allow. This way the piston will stop against the screw in plug helping to reduce the amount of meat left over in the stuffer.

Used a lathe to cut 2 o-ring grooves in the 3" cap. Place the grooves as close to each end of the cap as possible. Use 3/32" o-rings. I had to turn the outside of my cap to fit the pipe, this is a pot luck deal, some caps slid right in, others didn't. In my case the flat topped cap was a different brand than the pipe so I guess the stack-up of tolerances between mfg's caught me.

The clean-out plug with the square nut on it is the meat delivery end, drill and tap the nut for the compression fitting. The flat faces plug gets the ball valves, drill and tap according to what you have. Again, I used 1/2" ball valves.

Glue the threaded adapters on the pipe. Install your o-rings with Crisco or an equivelant. Crisco the inside of the pipe as well as the piston. Install the piston from the meat end with the flat end to the discharge side and slide it all the way down to the ball valve end. Screw the modified clean-out plugs into their respective end, NO GLUE HERE. You want to be able to take these in and out!

Hook up the water and let 'er go. Mine leaks maybe a teaspoons worth of water past the piston over the 2' of travel, as a result the piston will not return when the drain is opened, air sucks past instead. A length of wood dowel returns the piston just fine. I may look into an o-ring that isn't stretched quite so thin when installed to see if that'll stop the water/air leak.

#10 TwinMaples

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Posted 15 April 2011 - 03:37 PM

Scott, your post is cool. luxhello.gif It's obvious you've put some thought and time into this.

Hope you can post a photo once it's complete.

Jim

Here's a list of parts for one that hasn't stuffed a sausage yet but has survived a "dry" run......

1) 1-length of 4"pvc.
2) 2-4" threaded adapters, the kind that take a normal clean-out plug and slid on outside the pipe.
3) 2-clean-out plugs. One with a big square nut on it and one that's flat and looks like it takes a BIG screwdriver to turn it.
4) 1-3"pvc cap, it needs to have a flat top NOT the rounded top.
5) 2-ball valves and fittings. I used 1/2" pipe. The intake side hooks to a garden hose so you'll need fittings to make that possible and the other can end with a barbed fitting for a length of tubing.
6) 1-compression adapter. The one I used is pvc and has 3/4" male pipe on one end and is sized for 3/4"pvc on the other. The fitting has an o-ringed collar that allows a length of plastic pipe to be held in place mearly by tightening the collar by hand. One with 1/2" all the way to 1" would work fine depending on the size casings you're trying to stuff.

Here's what I did:

Cut the 4" pipe to 2' for no particular reason. Champfer the inside edges generously.

Used a lathe to bore the inside of one of the threaded adapters deeper so it would slide as far over the pipe as the clean-out plug would allow. This way the piston will stop against the screw in plug helping to reduce the amount of meat left over in the stuffer.

Used a lathe to cut 2 o-ring grooves in the 3" cap. Place the grooves as close to each end of the cap as possible. Use 3/32" o-rings. I had to turn the outside of my cap to fit the pipe, this is a pot luck deal, some caps slid right in, others didn't. In my case the flat topped cap was a different brand than the pipe so I guess the stack-up of tolerances between mfg's caught me.

The clean-out plug with the square nut on it is the meat delivery end, drill and tap the nut for the compression fitting. The flat faces plug gets the ball valves, drill and tap according to what you have. Again, I used 1/2" ball valves.

Glue the threaded adapters on the pipe. Install your o-rings with Crisco or an equivelant. Crisco the inside of the pipe as well as the piston. Install the piston from the meat end with the flat end to the discharge side and slide it all the way down to the ball valve end. Screw the modified clean-out plugs into their respective end, NO GLUE HERE. You want to be able to take these in and out!

Hook up the water and let 'er go. Mine leaks maybe a teaspoons worth of water past the piston over the 2' of travel, as a result the piston will not return when the drain is opened, air sucks past instead. A length of wood dowel returns the piston just fine. I may look into an o-ring that isn't stretched quite so thin when installed to see if that'll stop the water/air leak.



#11 ScottNC

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 07:14 AM

New computer in January and have no excuse for not loading the picture/camera software. A week ago our vacuum packer fried it's printed circuit board, replacement enroute. Hope is that by the weekend sausage will be in the works. Maybe that'll get me to work on the computer......

#12 ScottNC

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 01:04 PM

Ran 10 pounds of venison sausage through version one of stuffer this morning. Normal first time issues; 1) The small amount of water by-passing the piston can be an issue. 2) There needs to be valve on the outlet. 3) With natural gut sausage casing 3/4" pvc is too large for a stuffing tube, much time is wasted working the misc. smaller ones on.

Posted this update incase any of you were pursuing the construction of a simular contraption. Once the bugs are corrected I'll try to post a few pix's.

#13 bzac

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 02:41 AM

there are differnt types of PVC .
make sure you use the food grade type.




Zac Brown

#14 bzac

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 02:41 AM

there are differnt types of PVC .
make sure you use the food grade type.




Zac Brown




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