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Specific Gravity Too Low?


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#1 wrpopp

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 11:35 AM

I started a 3 gallon batch of Victory Blackberry wine on March 7th. The starting specific gravity was 1.092. On March 16th, I racked the wine into the secondary fermenter and checked the specific gravity. It was at .990. I want this to be a dry wine, but is .990 to low at this stage? I'm worried about ending up with a 3 gallon batch of blackberry vinegar. Any help will be appreciated.

#2 cutter

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 12:59 PM

An ending SG of .990 is not too low. It is just right for a dry wine. It won't turn to vinegar because all of the sugar that the vinegar bacteria need to make vinegar has been converted to alcohol. Of course I am assuming that you sanitized your equipment and used some Kmeta in the must to keep the vinegar bacteria out of it in the first place.
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#3 wrpopp

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 01:23 PM

An ending SG of .990 is not too low. It is just right for a dry wine. It won't turn to vinegar because all of the sugar that the vinegar bacteria need to make vinegar has been converted to alcohol. Of course I am assuming that you sanitized your equipment and used some Kmeta in the must to keep the vinegar bacteria out of it in the first place.


Thank you, Cutter. I added 2 crushed Campden tablets to the must 24 hours before adding the yeast, and I always sanitize my equipment with OneStep sanitizer.

#4 Wade's Wines

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 07:33 PM

.990 is perfect! S.G and vinegar aren't directly related. Sugar does not convert to vinegar; alcohol does.
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#5 wrpopp

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 08:08 PM

.990 is perfect! S.G and vinegar aren't directly related. Sugar does not convert to vinegar; alcohol does.


Thanks Colonel,
What actually causes the alcohol to convert to vinegar? Is it oxidation?

#6 Wade's Wines

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 08:41 PM

No, it's acitober bacteria... someone correct me if I'm wrong.
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#7 Steve mead

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 08:59 AM

No, it's acitober bacteria... someone correct me if I'm wrong.

Close enough, Wade. Actually it's acetobactor. It converts (ferments) alcohol into acetic acid.

#8 Wade's Wines

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 10:01 PM

Thanks, Steve, 3 glasses of Blackberry Wine and I forgot a few letters! lmao.gif Go figure!
WR, May I suggest a little $3 book, Enjoy Home Winemaking by Frist that helped me a lot in understanding the whole process. You can find it online. Lots of general recipes etc. in it as well.
Best of luck!
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#9 wrpopp

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Posted 25 March 2011 - 10:17 PM

Thanks, Steve, 3 glasses of Blackberry Wine and I forgot a few letters! lmao.gif Go figure!
WR, May I suggest a little $3 book, Enjoy Home Winemaking by Frist that helped me a lot in understanding the whole process. You can find it online. Lots of general recipes etc. in it as well.
Best of luck!


Thanks again, Colonel! I found it at Amazon for $4.00 and placed my order. I purchased "The Joy of Home Winemaking" several years ago and that is also a very good book with lots of useful info, but it is nice to have a forum such as this one to get advice from those who are willing to share what they've learned.

#10 Tomer1

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Posted 26 March 2011 - 06:04 AM

There is a family called Glucobacter which can oxidize glucose direct into acetic acid.
cool ha?


0.990 is as low is it can be, 0 gr\L of simple sugars, dry as a dessert river bed in the summer time.
My advice may or may not be backed by actually personal expirience and should be treated as such. :)




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