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Restart Batch?


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#1 Qpats

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 03:30 PM

Hello everyone!

I have made about 10 kits so far and they all turned out great except 2.

It is the WE Vintner's reserve Bergamais and the WE World Vineyards Zinfandel/Shiraz.

I aged them in carboy for about 7 months. I think I had issues with degassing.

Even after 7 months, there still was some co2. I bottled them anyways and they seemed like they tasted OK but nothing like the other kits I have made. My best kit so far has been the Mezza Luna Red. I haven't started any Selection kits yet.

My question is: Should I put my wine in the carboy again and let it settle longer and rebottle or just let it age in the bottle the way it is?

There is just a very odd taste that I cannot describe. Almost vinegary...All my other kits were not like that before.

What are your thoughts on this?

Thanks!

#2 Tomer1

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 06:07 PM

You were in a hurry to make another kit ha? luxhello.gif

A couple of question which will give us a hint if its spoilage or something alse:
Did it have the same weirdness when you tasted it before bottling?
Did you sulfit at bottle?
Does it smell ok?
Is it as fizzy as it was when you bottled?

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#3 tom sawyer

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 06:43 PM

Vinegar is not a good off-flavor. It could be acidic from the CO2 though. You might try decanting the wine for a few hours or even overnight before drinking it. If that works and you don't want to do it every time, then you can consider bulking for degassing. Personally I'd do anything to avoid pouring out of bottles and back into a carboy. Thats just a lot of handling and asking for oxidation.

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#4 Bar Barrique

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 10:32 PM

Did you add additional sulphite? You bulk aged for 7 months. Personally I tend to bulk age for extended periods of time, but I do add additional suphite (your kit instructions should include this information). If the fermentation locks dry out; the wine can quickly deplete the protection of the sulphite in the wine, and, additional amounts may be required. If your wine is tasting like vinegar it may be "spoiling".

Bar

#5 JW Austin

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 09:15 AM

Welcome to the forum, Qpats. Your issue is gas. Gassy wine does have an off flavor to me. For future reference, to properly degas your wine, raise the temperature to 75' or so and degas vigorously over several days. Extended bulk aging doesn't always degas a wine, as you can see. Try decanting, as Lennie suggested, or you can try to degas it with a Vac-U-Vin if you have one. They only cost $10 or so and are handy for keeping half-full bottles overnight. Pour out a small glass of wine, give the bottle a shake, then apply the vac-u-vin for an hour or so.

I don't think I would recommend opening all the bottles to degas. It's a lot of work and subjects the wine to too much oxygen to be worthwhile.

I have noticed that my WE Selection Estate LOVZ and also the CabFranc/Merlot taste much better after 2 years of aging. I bottled both batches without properly degassing them. I stabilized both in the month of February, so they probably weren't warmed up for degassing. Now I know :P
Jim W

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#6 Qpats

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 09:31 AM

Thanks for the replies guys!

I did not add additional sulfite to the carboy.

What I did is add vodka to the airlock thinking it would prevent my wine batch from going bad.

I did notice the level of water/vodka dropped in the airlock at one point.

I am thinking it got too low and the wine got contaminated.

With all the kits I have made, it seems I got better results with bottling after let's say 45 to 60 days.

Some of my other kits had a little bit of fizz but not that much.

I may try to get a vacuvin and go from there.

#7 Qpats

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 09:33 AM

It seems a little less fizzy but more than I would like. I feel like it tasted Ok when I first bottled but not great. Now it almost has a soapy tastes. Very hard to describe!







You were in a hurry to make another kit ha? luxhello.gif

A couple of question which will give us a hint if its spoilage or something alse:
Did it have the same weirdness when you tasted it before bottling?
Did you sulfit at bottle?
Does it smell ok?
Is it as fizzy as it was when you bottled?



#8 Bar Barrique

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 10:16 PM

If your wine is a bit oxidized; you can uncork it, and, pour it back into a primary fermenter, then add 1/4 tsp of sulphite. Alternately you could uncork, and, the add a small amount of sulphite to each bottle, then re-cork. It will take a bit of time for the wine to "recover", but it may be better than dumping it. If it is more damaged, you can add sulphite, and, fine with finings that are specific to oxidized wine (I have used polycar, though I don't know whether I would use it now).
Vodka in a fermentation lock would tend to evaporate faster than plain water, I have heard of some folks using glycerin (doesn't evaporate) in their fermentation locks.

Good Luck

Bar

#9 Qpats

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 07:41 AM

Thanks Bar
I will try to add sulphite to each bottle and see how it goes?

Let's say I would uncork the wine and pour it back in the primary: How long does it have to stay in there?

I guess I just need to add the sulfite to the bacth, stir and rebottle?



If your wine is a bit oxidized; you can uncork it, and, pour it back into a primary fermenter, then add 1/4 tsp of sulphite. Alternately you could uncork, and, the add a small amount of sulphite to each bottle, then re-cork. It will take a bit of time for the wine to "recover", but it may be better than dumping it. If it is more damaged, you can add sulphite, and, fine with finings that are specific to oxidized wine (I have used polycar, though I don't know whether I would use it now).
Vodka in a fermentation lock would tend to evaporate faster than plain water, I have heard of some folks using glycerin (doesn't evaporate) in their fermentation locks.

Good Luck

Bar



#10 Bar Barrique

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 09:47 PM

Thanks Bar
I will try to add sulphite to each bottle and see how it goes?

Let's say I would uncork the wine and pour it back in the primary: How long does it have to stay in there?

I guess I just need to add the sulfite to the bacth, stir and rebottle?

Yes; you would rebottle immediately, if you poured the wine back into a primary fermenter. If you choose to add some sulphite to each bottle, you can take 1/8-1/4 tsp, and, divide it between 15 bottles.

Good Luck

Bar




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