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#1 surlees

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Posted 02 February 2011 - 03:14 PM

Today I plan to start a 6 gal. batch of apple wine using pasteurized organic apple juice. I know that apples are high in malic acid which can cause a grape wine to be bitter or tart tasting.

Has anyone here done MLF on apple wine? If so, did it improve it?

I know that TA and pH will need to be adjusted afterward, but does replacing malic acid with tartaric acid improve the taste. Or, should I just let it be?

Thanks,

Fred

#2 bzac

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Posted 02 February 2011 - 03:34 PM

I have , and it ruined it, flat insipid and buttery.
if you must try it, do it on a one gallon batch and see if you like it before you inoculate the whole batch,
Above all relax , it's winemaking ,it's not supposed to be stressfull . It's not sky diving.

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#3 Tomer1

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Posted 02 February 2011 - 04:04 PM

Since its pastuerized I think you will need to use a culture,
Uping the TA with tartaric acid to bring it back to balance should produce a very interesting medium body wine.
Also try some oak. could be an awesome twist on the buttery oaked chard.
My advice may or may not be backed by actually personal expirience and should be treated as such. :)

#4 Wade's Wines

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Posted 02 February 2011 - 05:28 PM

There are over a thousand kinds of apples, I believe.
The very best Apple Wine I ever made went through a spontaneous MLF while bulk aging. I'd do it again in a heart beat!
My guess is Zac and I used different apple varieties or different ML strains.
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#5 Gibbon

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 04:18 AM

I've often wondered about this b/c any apple wine or cider I've done hase a way too big malic acid profile in the end.

However, I can't stand even a hint of diacytel in anything. If I could find an apple that wasn't so twangy it might solve the problem.

#6 Tomer1

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 06:46 AM

Promalic can help you with that If you wish to avoid MLF and reduce malic, then use 71B yeast which consumes 15-20% malic.
Of course its not worth the expense of this speciality product if your doing a 5 gallon batch.
My advice may or may not be backed by actually personal expirience and should be treated as such. :)

#7 Gibbon

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 07:27 AM

What if you juiced and apple like red delicious which seem to be mild on the malic acid. What variety did you use Wade?

I think a high malic acid apple would produce quite a bit of diacytle since there is so much malic acid to consume.

If you could pull off a good MLF and then maybe even oak it like a Chard you might have a nice wine.

#8 Tomer1

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 08:41 AM

Theres are commericals strains\cultures which are more neutral in "buttery notes" production.
My advice may or may not be backed by actually personal expirience and should be treated as such. :)

#9 surlees

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 11:55 AM

I appreciate everyone's input on my question. I think I'm going to skip MLF on the 6 gallon batch because the juice I'm using is not overly tart. I have no idea what apples my juice was made from, but since it was made for drinking my guess is the apples used were the less acidic varieties. I think I'll buy another gallon and try MLF on it before I risk my 6 gallon batch. I'll post a followup on how the one gallon turns out.

Fred

#10 Wade's Wines

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 06:06 PM

I use every variety I can get my hands on, combined.
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#11 maseratiman

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 06:41 PM

I use every variety I can get my hands on, combined.


That's just what the cider folks do up here. They mix the varities they have on hand. Wonder how cider apples made into wine would do... might be excellent!

-Marc
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#12 Tomer1

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 03:06 AM

Mix and match always works best, power of luck smileytoast.gif
My advice may or may not be backed by actually personal expirience and should be treated as such. :)

#13 Gibbon

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 04:00 AM

I use every variety I can get my hands on, combined.


Did you let it wildly ferment too? The folks that wild ferment there ciders always tell me that's were they get their best results.

Any time I've used "cider" that's where I get the nasty twang, but I am usually using pasteurized stuff and pitching yeast.

#14 Wade's Wines

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 05:12 AM

I've always used "domestic" store bought yeast. Maybe I'll try a wild ferment on it this year, just for fun! smileytoast.gif smileytoast.gif
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#15 mokadir

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Posted 10 February 2011 - 10:36 AM

I also had a small jug of a bigger batch undergo MLF once and did not like the result. I have tried not to do it again. I haven't tried the natural yeast route either, typically going with a champagne yeast. Also, I should preface the comment with the fact that I no longer make apple wine, just sparkling cyser (typically ~7-8% abv), so I prefer that there is good acidic "bite" to it.
Bob
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