Jump to content


Photo

Concord Grapes...how Much Water Should I Add?


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 Allen B

Allen B

    Veteran Wine Maker

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 356 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brownsburg, IN, USA

Posted 24 August 2010 - 06:57 AM

I got 28 pounds of Concords. Not much, but it's what I got. Crushed the grapes by hand, just enough to break the skins. The juice & the grapes together in the primary look like about 2-1/2 gallons. If I pull up the muslin bag, it is much less, since the majority of the juice is still in the grapes.

I found two recipes on Jack Keller's site HERE. They vary greatly on the amount of water to add. The first says to add 1-1/4 gallons for every 6 pounds of concord grapes, the second says to add 1/4 gallons for every 12 pounds.

I plan on making a semi-sweet wine. Any opinions out there on what I should do?

Thanks!
Allen Brown
http:\\www.IndyBlueprints.com
http:\www.UBuildItIndy.com

#2 Truman

Truman

    Veteran Wine Maker

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 464 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eastern Kentucky
  • Interests:making wine, fishing, sporting events, my grandchildren

Posted 24 August 2010 - 07:09 AM

I got 28 pounds of Concords. Not much, but it's what I got. Crushed the grapes by hand, just enough to break the skins. The juice & the grapes together in the primary look like about 2-1/2 gallons. If I pull up the muslin bag, it is much less, since the majority of the juice is still in the grapes.

I found two recipes on Jack Keller's site HERE. They vary greatly on the amount of water to add. The first says to add 1-1/4 gallons for every 6 pounds of concord grapes, the second says to add 1/4 gallons for every 12 pounds.

I plan on making a semi-sweet wine. Any opinions out there on what I should do?

Thanks!


I have made Concord both ways. You can get a light wine from that much fruit or you could add some cans of frozen concentrate. The best Concord I've made (imho) has only one gallon of water in a six gallon batch. I would add about six or eight cans of frozen Welches concentrate to the fresh grapes for a six gallon batch , adjust the acid and gravity, and ferment to dry. You can then adjust the sweetness as desired. Just my 2 cents.
Truman "maker of mountain wine"

#3 Green Zeus

Green Zeus

    Look Out Ernest & Julio

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1732 posts
  • Location:Ohio

Posted 24 August 2010 - 07:35 AM

Yes, you could do it the way Truman suggests. I guess it depends on what you're trying to do. If you never made concord before, you might want to make about 2 gallons with it by adding no water so you can taste what a good concord is like. We add no water to our grapes. Test the PH of the juice and adjust if needed. We set our PH at 3.4 and our alcohol at 12.5% If you don't have enough juice for taking a hydrometer reading, add just a pint of water or so.

#4 dagobob

dagobob

    Look Out Ernest & Julio

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2071 posts
  • Location:Pittsburgh
  • Interests:growing dahlias, beer and wine making, gardening, hunting, fishing

Posted 24 August 2010 - 07:56 AM

I got 28 pounds of Concords. Not much, but it's what I got. Crushed the grapes by hand, just enough to break the skins. The juice & the grapes together in the primary look like about 2-1/2 gallons. If I pull up the muslin bag, it is much less, since the majority of the juice is still in the grapes.

I found two recipes on Jack Keller's site HERE. They vary greatly on the amount of water to add. The first says to add 1-1/4 gallons for every 6 pounds of concord grapes, the second says to add 1/4 gallons for every 12 pounds.

I plan on making a semi-sweet wine. Any opinions out there on what I should do?

Thanks!

I don't add water when I make concord from grapes; if you need to top off use grape juice.

2013 Wines:
Noiret; Muscat; Vignoles; Pear/Apple, Zinfandel/Merlot/Cab-Sav Blend; Elderberry; Blackberry/Elderberry;


#5 Allen B

Allen B

    Veteran Wine Maker

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 356 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brownsburg, IN, USA

Posted 24 August 2010 - 07:57 AM

Is there much difference between using grape juice, & grape juice from concentrate?
Allen Brown
http:\\www.IndyBlueprints.com
http:\www.UBuildItIndy.com

#6 smokinjoe359

smokinjoe359

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 888 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Niles, Ohio

Posted 24 August 2010 - 08:43 AM

Is there much difference between using grape juice, & grape juice from concentrate?

maybe additives and preservitives.and how much it is diluted.
Joe

#7 thebacchus

thebacchus

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 198 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Topeka, KS
  • Interests:Wine!

Posted 24 August 2010 - 08:45 AM

I got 28 pounds of Concords. Not much, but it's what I got. Crushed the grapes by hand, just enough to break the skins. The juice & the grapes together in the primary look like about 2-1/2 gallons. If I pull up the muslin bag, it is much less, since the majority of the juice is still in the grapes.

I found two recipes on Jack Keller's site HERE. They vary greatly on the amount of water to add. The first says to add 1-1/4 gallons for every 6 pounds of concord grapes, the second says to add 1/4 gallons for every 12 pounds.

I plan on making a semi-sweet wine. Any opinions out there on what I should do?

Thanks!


It depends year to year on your Brix, TA and PH.

Essentially, Jacks recipe ameliorates (dilutes with sugar water, while maintaining brix level) the must to lower the TA & increase PH. Last year, this would have been more critical in our area than it is this year. We had acid bombs last year; the numbers are MUCH better this year after the heat increased.

What are your Brix, TA and PH readings?

-Bob

#8 Allen B

Allen B

    Veteran Wine Maker

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 356 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brownsburg, IN, USA

Posted 25 August 2010 - 11:36 AM



What are your Brix, TA and PH readings?

-Bob


I added a couple of gallons of purchased juice.

OG 1050, so Bx is about 13. Added sugar to 1090.
TA is .65%
PH is 3.5 (roughly, I'm uising strips)
Allen Brown
http:\\www.IndyBlueprints.com
http:\www.UBuildItIndy.com

#9 thebacchus

thebacchus

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 198 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Topeka, KS
  • Interests:Wine!

Posted 25 August 2010 - 11:50 AM

I added a couple of gallons of purchased juice.

OG 1050, so Bx is about 13. Added sugar to 1090.
TA is .65%
PH is 3.5 (roughly, I'm uising strips)


I am assuming these readings are after the juice addition.

If so, I wouldn't add any water. You will end up lowering the TA & SG and increasing the PH. You are right in the ranges I would want to be in.

My right hand would want to add just a touch more acid before fermentation while my left handing would be smacking it to wait. That will depend on the yeast you use, the style you want, etc. I wouldn't hesitate to pitch the yeast with those numbers and tweak later.

-Bob

#10 Allen B

Allen B

    Veteran Wine Maker

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 356 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brownsburg, IN, USA

Posted 25 August 2010 - 11:58 AM

Thanks Bob, Yes, those numbers are after adding the juice. I did just pitch the yeast. I plan on giving the wine a semi-sweet finish.
Allen Brown
http:\\www.IndyBlueprints.com
http:\www.UBuildItIndy.com

#11 thebacchus

thebacchus

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 198 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Topeka, KS
  • Interests:Wine!

Posted 25 August 2010 - 12:02 PM

Thanks Bob, Yes, those numbers are after adding the juice. I did just pitch the yeast. I plan on giving the wine a semi-sweet finish.


I would just keep an eye on your acid and PH. It will drop a little, especially if you cold stabilize it. You might want to add a little at the end. If it's a little low, a little citric acid before or while sweetening might sharpen it up a little. I can taste it already!

-Bob

#12 dagobob

dagobob

    Look Out Ernest & Julio

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2071 posts
  • Location:Pittsburgh
  • Interests:growing dahlias, beer and wine making, gardening, hunting, fishing

Posted 25 August 2010 - 12:11 PM

Thanks Bob, Yes, those numbers are after adding the juice. I did just pitch the yeast. I plan on giving the wine a semi-sweet finish.

This is going to turn out great, trust me, I've found that back-sweetening to about 1.013 is just about right. 1.010 tastes good, but it leaves you with that feeling that maybe you could have added a bit more sugar. 1.015 tastes good also, but leaves you wondering that you may have sweetened it too much. But in the end you and your wife are the best judge. Use these comments as guidelines.

2013 Wines:
Noiret; Muscat; Vignoles; Pear/Apple, Zinfandel/Merlot/Cab-Sav Blend; Elderberry; Blackberry/Elderberry;


#13 Allen B

Allen B

    Veteran Wine Maker

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 356 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brownsburg, IN, USA

Posted 25 August 2010 - 12:38 PM

This is going to turn out great, trust me, I've found that back-sweetening to about 1.013 is just about right. 1.010 tastes good, but it leaves you with that feeling that maybe you could have added a bit more sugar. 1.015 tastes good also, but leaves you wondering that you may have sweetened it too much. But in the end you and your wife are the best judge. Use these comments as guidelines.


So that 1013 would put it at about 3.5% residual sugar?
Allen Brown
http:\\www.IndyBlueprints.com
http:\www.UBuildItIndy.com

#14 dagobob

dagobob

    Look Out Ernest & Julio

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2071 posts
  • Location:Pittsburgh
  • Interests:growing dahlias, beer and wine making, gardening, hunting, fishing

Posted 25 August 2010 - 12:49 PM

So that 1013 would put it at about 3.5% residual sugar?

hmmmm, I don't have any means of determining residual sugar by percentage after fermentation. I use a hygrometer as my guide, and of course my taste. Your final decision is likely to be based on your alcohol level and acidity. But since my alcohol is usually always 12.5 +/- .5 and my pH 3.4 +/- .2; (TA .8 +/- .1) I get fairly predictable results.

2013 Wines:
Noiret; Muscat; Vignoles; Pear/Apple, Zinfandel/Merlot/Cab-Sav Blend; Elderberry; Blackberry/Elderberry;


#15 Allen B

Allen B

    Veteran Wine Maker

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 356 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brownsburg, IN, USA

Posted 25 August 2010 - 01:09 PM

hmmmm, I don't have any means of determining residual sugar by percentage after fermentation. I use a hygrometer as my guide, and of course my taste. Your final decision is likely to be based on your alcohol level and acidity. But since my alcohol is usually always 12.5 +/- .5 and my pH 3.4 +/- .2; (TA .8 +/- .1) I get fairly predictable results.

1.013 SG on the hydrometer is 3.5 on the Balling Scale (on same hydrometer). Balling is the same as Brix, but measured to fewer decimals (I believe). See This Link.

The reason I am asking about a residual sugar amount, is a new Meadery opened here in Indy, and he lists residual sugar percentage on all his wines, so you can judge the sweetness of one compared to the next. Obviously you can do this by taste, but I think it's a generally good idea, so I can have a "common" labeling method. (the average consumer has no idea what SG 1.013 means, but he can understand a 5% residual sugar level).
Allen Brown
http:\\www.IndyBlueprints.com
http:\www.UBuildItIndy.com




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users