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Yeast For Barbera?


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#1 greenmind

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Posted 20 June 2010 - 01:53 PM

Anyone have any advice on a yeast strain for Barbera? More Wine's guide doesn't have a recommendation, Pambiachi's book recommends yeasts I can't find in home winemaking quantities. I have some RC212 lying around - would that be a reasonable one to use?

Dave

#2 Peter Lynch

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Posted 20 June 2010 - 02:21 PM

Dave, I used BRL-97 on last year's barbera with good results. Unfortunately, morewinemaking.com (my go to store for hard to get yeasts) is not selling it (I think I scored some from the winery's 500g stash).Anyway, RC212 would be a fine yeast especially if you want to highlight barbera's tutti-frutti aromas. If you want to emphasize the tannins (Barbera is not very tannic) then D-80 might be a good choice. I used that with a Chambourcin a few years back and the wine took a gold in the WineMaker Mag competition (I consider Barbera and Chambourcin somewhat similar - Deep color, fruity, low tannins). Anyway, I'm sure you'll get other recommendations. Good luck! smileytoast.gif
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#3 moundtop

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Posted 20 June 2010 - 09:11 PM

I used Wyeast Liquid Chianti yeast (#4244) on a bucket of frozen Barbera must last winter. Just tasted my first bottle recently and was quite pleased with the result. Color extraction was good. Fermented at 87+ deggrees.
Frank from Vermillion, South Dakota

#4 greenmind

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 06:15 PM

Peter and Frank, thanks for the advice. I think I will try the RC212 unless someone else chimes in and tells me that it's a horrible idea. I would prefer a fruity style Barbera - I'm currently awash with tannic reds and want something lighter that isn't pinot noir or sangiovese. Thus, Barbera! Thanks again, and I will report back on the outcome with RC212.

#5 Peter Lynch

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 07:41 PM

Peter and Frank, thanks for the advice. I think I will try the RC212 unless someone else chimes in and tells me that it's a horrible idea. I would prefer a fruity style Barbera - I'm currently awash with tannic reds and want something lighter that isn't pinot noir or sangiovese. Thus, Barbera! Thanks again, and I will report back on the outcome with RC212.

Well you'll certainly attain your goal with Barbera. My 2009 is all bright fruit on the nose and (even now) easy on the finish. You might consider blending some Cabernet (or other tannic wines like Petite Sirah) into a portion of your Barbera to create a sort of Super Piedmont. IMO, Barbera doesn't get the attention it really deserves (in its own right or as a blending partner). I'm upping my production this fall to give a fruity lift to many of my other blends. Good luck and have fun. Let us know how it develops! smileytoast.gif
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#6 greenmind

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 09:19 PM

Well you'll certainly attain your goal with Barbera. My 2009 is all bright fruit on the nose and (even now) easy on the finish. You might consider blending some Cabernet (or other tannic wines like Petite Sirah) into a portion of your Barbera to create a sort of Super Piedmont. IMO, Barbera doesn't get the attention it really deserves (in its own right or as a blending partner). I'm upping my production this fall to give a fruity lift to many of my other blends. Good luck and have fun. Let us know how it develops! smileytoast.gif

Peter, how much oak (if any) do you give your Barbera?

#7 Peter Lynch

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Posted 22 June 2010 - 05:35 AM

Peter, how much oak (if any) do you give your Barbera?

There is no right or wrong. Many commercial producers use oak to add tannin, depth and complexity to their barbera's but at the cost, according to some, of internationalizing the wine. Other prefer no or very light oak treatment for a more fruit forward traditional style of barbera.I personally choose to give my 6 gallons a post fermentation dosage of 50-60 Hungarian Medium Toast Plus cubes. This is a middle of the road oak dosage that might replicate a 2 or 3 year old barrel. So far the wine's fruit has more then stood up to that application. smileytoast.gif
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#8 greenmind

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 02:59 PM

Dave, I used BRL-97 on last year's barbera with good results. Unfortunately, morewinemaking.com (my go to store for hard to get yeasts) is not selling it (I think I scored some from the winery's 500g stash).Anyway, RC212 would be a fine yeast especially if you want to highlight barbera's tutti-frutti aromas. If you want to emphasize the tannins (Barbera is not very tannic) then D-80 might be a good choice. I used that with a Chambourcin a few years back and the wine took a gold in the WineMaker Mag competition (I consider Barbera and Chambourcin somewhat similar - Deep color, fruity, low tannins). Anyway, I'm sure you'll get other recommendations. Good luck! smileytoast.gif

I went to my LHBS today and they did not have much choice in yeast. But I did pick up some Pasteur Red - which I saw mentioned on another discussion board as a good potential candidate for Barbera. I don't know anything about Pasteur Red - what are its characteristics, and is it a good match for Barbera? Given that I now have my must buckets and they will probably be thawed by this evening, my choice is down to the yeast on hand: RC212 or Pasteur Red? Any strong opinion for one or the other?

Thanks again,

Dave

#9 Peter Lynch

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Posted 24 June 2010 - 08:01 PM

I went to my LHBS today and they did not have much choice in yeast. But I did pick up some Pasteur Red - which I saw mentioned on another discussion board as a good potential candidate for Barbera. I don't know anything about Pasteur Red - what are its characteristics, and is it a good match for Barbera? Given that I now have my must buckets and they will probably be thawed by this evening, my choice is down to the yeast on hand: RC212 or Pasteur Red? Any strong opinion for one or the other?

Dave, if you put a gun to my head I would probably go with the RC212 if I was (as you are) looking for an emphasis on the fruit. If you have multiple pails you could split the difference and do at least one with the Pasture Red (a good yeast BTW) and then evaluate the differences. Blending the separate wines later can add complexity so I think you've got nothing to lose. FWIW, here is some marketing info on Pasture Red:

Red StarŪ Pasteur RedTM (Davis 904), a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been derived from the collection of the Institute Pasteur in Paris. It is a strong, even fermenter that produces full bodied reds. This yeast encourages the development of varietal fruit flavors, balanced by complex aromas, especially when using grapes of the Cabernet family. It may be necessary to cool the fermenting must to prevent unwanted temperature increase. This yeast is reported to give character to less robust red grapes, or those picked before optimum development.

One thing to be aware of is that RC212 may require more nutrient care then Bordeaux Red so make sure you have sufficient yeast nutrient on hand. Good luck! I'm sure whatever you decide the wine will be a success. smileytoast.gif
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#10 greenmind

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 11:46 AM

Dave, if you put a gun to my head I would probably go with the RC212 if I was (as you are) looking for an emphasis on the fruit. If you have multiple pails you could split the difference and do at least one with the Pasture Red (a good yeast BTW) and then evaluate the differences. Blending the separate wines later can add complexity so I think you've got nothing to lose. FWIW, here is some marketing info on Pasture Red:


One thing to be aware of is that RC212 may require more nutrient care then Bordeaux Red so make sure you have sufficient yeast nutrient on hand. Good luck! I'm sure whatever you decide the wine will be a success. smileytoast.gif

Thanks again Peter - I owe you a bottle once it is finished. I ended up going with RC212 (before I saw your post). I'm well stocked in nutrient, so I should be all set.

Cheers!

Dave

#11 Brett C.

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 11:59 AM

Thanks again Peter - I owe you a bottle once it is finished. I ended up going with RC212 (before I saw your post). I'm well stocked in nutrient, so I should be all set.

Cheers!

Dave

I'm curious; what were the numbers on the Barbera (TA, pH, Brix)?

Brett

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#12 Peter Lynch

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Posted 25 June 2010 - 06:50 PM

Thanks again Peter - I owe you a bottle once it is finished. I ended up going with RC212 (before I saw your post). I'm well stocked in nutrient, so I should be all set.

Dave, if your fruit is sound I'm sure you'll end up liking the results. You owe me nothing (advice is free) but If you'd like to send me a PM with your mailing address I'd be happy to send you a bottle of my barbera (once bottled this coming fall) if you would be so kind as to reciprocate. Regardless, good luck! smileytoast.gif
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