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Wine Without The Sulfites?


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#16 Howie

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Posted 08 May 2010 - 03:40 AM

I use K-meta in my wines. However, if I were motivated to make a wine without it, I would ferment using EC-1118 yeast, which from my understanding, can produce SO2 during fermentation at levels of 20-30 ppm, or about half the K-meta dose recommended.
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#17 ryankelley

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Posted 08 May 2010 - 07:09 AM

Sulfite Allergies

This link has some good information on sulfite allergies.

I'm going to try to make a low sulfite batch of skeeter pee soon. Maybe I'll use the 1118 yeast and skip the Kmeta all together.

This post wasn't intended to discuss my symptoms...this is a wine making site. I was just interested in the chances of making a good batch of skeeter pee without the Kmeta. A batch of skeeter pee only cost me about $15-20 for 6 gallons, so it wouldn't be the end of the world if I failed to make a drinkable batch.

Peach wine - 5 gallons from out of state peaches

6 gallons Pinot Noir - month 12 bulk aging

 

 

 

 

 

 


#18 rawlus

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Posted 08 May 2010 - 09:45 PM

i happen to think charles shaw making you sick is a pretty normal reaction to crap wine. if it didnt make you sick, then id begin to worry.

as far as headaches/hangovers - it is not sulfites in wine that cause these.

#19 hamster

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Posted 09 May 2010 - 01:34 AM

Beer is usually made without any sulfites, and people homebrew it all the time. You'll have to be vigilant about sanitizing stuff, though. And probably wash the grapes before fermenting. Finally, wine will not age as well as normal wine, and it'll die faster once opened.

One more thing I'd like to point out is that, unless I'm mistaken, "organic wines" are required to be manufactured without sulfites. I don't know about Ohio, but here in California we have a number of chains (e.g. Whole Foods Market) that focus on organic & sustainable agriculture, and some of them will carry organic wine as well. If you can find some organic wine and do some tests, you can confirm or disprove whether sulfites are to blame for your condition.

#20 Tomer1

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Posted 09 May 2010 - 01:49 PM

Yes no sulfites and organicly grown vines only, usually fermented by wild yeast (both alcohol and MLF).
If bottled cerfully using inert gas, stored at low temp and measure at a low ph with a good amount of tannin these wines could easly age without oxyganation for a few years in the bottle.

If I were into tatoos... I would tatoo some grapes on my forarm. :P


#21 fshfindr

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Posted 09 May 2010 - 04:36 PM

First, I believe that this forum is a perfect place for this discussion. We're talking wine and how wine is made plus the fact that it is an interesting subject. As it should be to all of us who make wine. As to making wine w/o sulfite: I have made sulfite free wine. That wine is about 2 years old right now and 2 months ago when I last tasted it, it was fine. I have friends who eschew any additives to their wine. IMHO, my wine with additives including sulfite is better than theirs. Just my opinion, they will and do disagree. The point is that making wine without sulfites is not only possible, but properly stored, it will last for about 2 years or more. So if anyone thinks that the sulfite is having a negative effect on health, make wine without sulfite.
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#22 kendall

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Posted 09 May 2010 - 07:18 PM

I have made my best batch of wine and it was sulfite free. It has stored well for 2+ years and if the reaction from those that I have given it to is any indication, I may never use sulfites.

The more I learn the more I realize how much I didn't know.

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#23 ryankelley

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Posted 10 May 2010 - 05:30 AM

First, I believe that this forum is a perfect place for this discussion. We're talking wine and how wine is made plus the fact that it is an interesting subject. As it should be to all of us who make wine. As to making wine w/o sulfite: I have made sulfite free wine. That wine is about 2 years old right now and 2 months ago when I last tasted it, it was fine. I have friends who eschew any additives to their wine. IMHO, my wine with additives including sulfite is better than theirs. Just my opinion, they will and do disagree. The point is that making wine without sulfites is not only possible, but properly stored, it will last for about 2 years or more. So if anyone thinks that the sulfite is having a negative effect on health, make wine without sulfite.



I'm in favor of adding as little to wine as possible. I'm thinking I might skip the sorbate also and use stevia or splenda for back sweetening. Although I'm not sure Stevia or Splenda count as "not adding anything."

When you have a difficult time swallowing some foods, you can't imagine how nice it is to have relief...the problem gets better and starts to go away. I haven't drank Charles Shaw in months and I am feeling a lot better.

Peach wine - 5 gallons from out of state peaches

6 gallons Pinot Noir - month 12 bulk aging

 

 

 

 

 

 


#24 Allen B

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Posted 10 May 2010 - 09:54 AM

Hi Ryan,
You might also consider using Xylitol instead of Stevia. It has a 1:1 ratio to sugar as far as sweetness. The only problem is it's about $31 for a 5# bag. I plan on sweetening 3 gallons of SP with it, and 3 gallons with sugar next weekend.

The biggest reason I am doing this, is my next batch (which is already in the primary, I am going to try to carbonate, using Xylitol for back sweetening.
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#25 ryankelley

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Posted 10 May 2010 - 10:00 AM

Hi Ryan,
You might also consider using Xylitol instead of Stevia. It has a 1:1 ratio to sugar as far as sweetness. The only problem is it's about $31 for a 5# bag. I plan on sweetening 3 gallons of SP with it, and 3 gallons with sugar next weekend.

The biggest reason I am doing this, is my next batch (which is already in the primary, I am going to try to carbonate, using Xylitol for back sweetening.



What method are you planning to use to carbonate it?

Peach wine - 5 gallons from out of state peaches

6 gallons Pinot Noir - month 12 bulk aging

 

 

 

 

 

 


#26 Allen B

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Posted 10 May 2010 - 10:07 AM

Just like I do with beer. I will not add the Kmeta or sorbate, so the yeast is still alive, then I will add the Xylitol for sweetness, then I will add 3/4 cup of corn sugar for a 5 gallon batch just before bottling in beer bottles. The corn sugar will give the yeast just enough food to carbonate.
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#27 Jack

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Posted 10 May 2010 - 09:49 PM

I would try Welch's Niagara grape juice from concentrate. It lists "contains sulphites" on the container and I once made Niagara wine from the concentrate and the sulphite levels were high enough so that I never had to add sulphites during aging or even before bottling (based on sulphite measurements). Personally, I would do a blind study. See if you can find a white grape juice without sulphites and also try the Welch's. Get someone to pour you a glass of each, not telling you which is which. Doing the same with dried fruit, some treated with sulphites and some treated without, would also be a good test (best done blind).
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#28 Tomer1

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 04:19 AM

The only problem is it's about $31 for a 5# bag.


No thats not your only problem, it has a laxitive effect since its a sugar-alchocol.

29] Like most sugar alcohols, it has a laxative effect because sugar alcohols are not fully broken down during digestion; albeit one-tenth the strength of sorbitol. The effect depends upon the individual. In one study of 13 children, 4 experienced diarrhea when consuming over 65 grams per day

All depends on how much you backsweet,
in a sweet wine a few cups can get you up to "that" dosing inflicting dieria.

If I were into tatoos... I would tatoo some grapes on my forarm. :P


#29 Tomer1

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 04:22 AM

Just like I do with beer. I will not add the Kmeta or sorbate, so the yeast is still alive, then I will add the Xylitol for sweetness, then I will add 3/4 cup of corn sugar for a 5 gallon batch just before bottling in beer bottles. The corn sugar will give the yeast just enough food to carbonate.

Your describing the champagne method right here,
In beer its fine if its a bit cloudy but in wine you will end up with a very cloudy wine and perhaps a bit "yeasty".

If I were into tatoos... I would tatoo some grapes on my forarm. :P


#30 Noontime

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 05:01 AM

Ryan- the best advice I can give you to identify what exactly is causing your problem is to do an elimination diet. It's not complicated, but can be difficult to continue without cheating. My wife is celiac and it took many years of misdiagnosis, inappropriate prescription drugs, and continued sickness to finally discover she just had to stop eating wheat gluten; now she's as healthy as a horse (albeit a very small pretty one). Eat nothing but 2 or 3 foods for a week (usually things like rice, zuccini, since hardly anyone on the planet is allergic to those) then start adding a food every other day. Pay attention to your symptoms (and use a journal) during the whole time to identify the things that your body does not like.

You can search the internet for "elimination diet" and get tons of info (if interseted of course)

And good luck with your low sulfite wine! smileytoast.gif
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