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Sparkolloid Powder


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#1 theaug

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Posted 17 February 2005 - 06:15 PM

I have never used any clearing agents at all......any info on this Sparkolloid Powder I got would be greatly appriciated......

I have made about 10 batches ..... most are still in the secondary clearing and aging......The first few batches I made I bottled shortly after clearing....which was about 2 months......and then tasted after a month in the bottle......To me they tasted young, which I expected. I know they are supposed to allow to age in the carboy 5 or 6 months....I was just anxious!!! After they sit in the carboy for 5-6 months I plan on letting them age in the bottle a couple of months as well.

Most of the batches seem to clear pretty good in a couple of months....except for the Apricot that I made from preserves. It's been sitting in the carboy about 2 months and is still pretty hazy. I picked up the Sparkolloid just in case....however I will be letting it sit in the carboy for at least 5 months and if it doens't clear I'll have to use it......

Any comments on using Sparkolloid??
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#2 breumyster

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 07:55 AM

You can find helpful info on and preparation instructions for sparkolloid and many other fining agents here:

http://www.leeners.c...ningagents.html

Bart

#3 Borisbbadd

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 08:15 AM

Sparkloid seems to work pretty good. If you use it, give it plenty of time to clear and settle before bottling ( learned from experience ).
The instructions say to leave it for 2-3 weeks, but I usually leave it for at least a month.

Randy
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#4 theaug

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 08:16 AM

11doh.gif
LOL.....no info there...........
I have already read the products 'fact sheet'.......what I'm looking for is personal opinion based on using the product. biggrin.gif
"Are you gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"
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#5 theaug

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 08:19 AM

Borisbbadd.........
Thanks for the info....that's just what I was looking for......
"Are you gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"
~The Outlaw Josey Whales~

#6 breumyster

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 09:22 AM

QUOTE (theaug @ Feb 18 2005, 08:48 AM)
11doh.gif
LOL.....no info there...........
I have already read the products 'fact sheet'.......what I'm looking for is personal opinion based on using the product. biggrin.gif

Well, you did say you've never used finings before, and you did ask for "any info"... smile.gif

Sparkolloid works well for some problems, it's just more of a pain in the butt to prep than some of the other fining agents, so it's down the list for me.

You should also be aware that most fining agents are designed to work on specific problems, and some have other effects on wine that should be considered before use. You may have to try several before you find one that produces results. You can check piwine.com for specific info on which agents will help with which problems.

Maybe this will be more help.

Bart

#7 apratt

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 09:35 AM

I have used sparkalloid exclusively for several years. I have only once had a problem with an apple wine not clearing after fining. It has always worked for me in less than two weeks. This is my own experience and I have nothing to compare it to. I recently started using a mini-jet and finished 2 gallons of apple and 1 gallon of plum by first using sparkalloid and after 2 weeks filtering with the mini-jet. They are both crystal clear with fantastic color.

I add the sparkalloid when racking. I boil the appropriate quantity of powder with water and pour it directly into the empty container that I am racking to. Then I rack the wine into it. This seems to disperse it well throughout.

Alan

#8 theaug

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 09:51 AM

laugh.gif breumyster.....thanks for the info.....and yes....any info is appriciated at this point....I have never had any dealing with any fining agents......Not even sure I'll use any.....my wines seem to clear on thier own so far.....It's just that this Apricot seems to be taking longer than the rest so I want to be prepared in case I decide to use finings.......

Thanks everyone tongue.gif
"Are you gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"
~The Outlaw Josey Whales~

#9 Vinmaker

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 10:01 AM

Aug.

If you think you need some "big guns". Then try the Super Kleer KC package. That will clear out mud. Works extremely fast.

If you are more patient. Then I recommend using more gently fining agents. Less is more when it comes to fining agents. I like to use none. But after many. many months, if it is still not clear then I reluctantly use them. Then again, I make mostly red wines. Which give you a little more leeway.

Happily Winemaking.

Waiting for the 2013 Harvest!


#10 Jay-CastleRock

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 10:04 AM

In selecting your fining agent, try and find one specifically for pectin haze. One choice may be Irish Moss as indicated in the post from Brewmiester. Since you made the apricot from preserves you have pectin protein out the wazoo.
Auguri,
Jay / Concetta Cellars - Traditionally crafted premium wines.

- This post is an original and crafted piece of expression. Any variations of grammar and spelling from the generally accepted norm accentuate itís individuality and uniqueness.

#11 breumyster

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 10:08 AM

My thinking is along the same lines as Jay's. I'd start with some pectic enzyme.

#12 theaug

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 10:19 AM

Pectic Enzyme?.....I have pectic enzyme that I use when the recipe calls for it.....Is this the same stuff.....and how do I use to clear?

thanks.......
"Are you gonna pull those pistols, or whistle Dixie?"
~The Outlaw Josey Whales~

#13 Rhodomel

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 10:25 AM

Our state regulations require that you will have to filter your wine if you used Sparkalloid as a fining agent. That is, if you intend to sell your wines. If unfiltered, sparkalloid has a bad habit of producing sediments long after racking.

#14 StevenSF

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 11:23 AM

Fining as applied to Cabernet Sauvignon.
After four racks of my 2004 crush, each done during the full moon, I decided to add a fining agent. While the must was progessively getting clearer I decided to see how mush a fining agents accelerated the collection and settling of suspended pulp fragments.
I sellected K---- original unflavored Gelatine purchased off the self at my local super market. I used one teaspoon for a 6 gallon carboy. After waiting the required 10 days I pulled a glass for inspection. When held to the sun (we have a lot of that in California) I was delighted; beautiful ruby color, and most important - clarity you would not believe.
I immediately fined all remaining carboys and will let the gelatine work it's wonder. After 10 days will rack one more time and just let the wine sit until I need the carboys for the next crush. The cost for the gelatine is pennies per carboy.
Also I have found that racking during the full moon facalitates howling caused by bad hose siphoning techenque.
Happy fining
Steven

#15 breumyster

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 11:52 AM

Gelatin is a good fining, but as with all finings, it is not a cure-all, and it does have its drawbacks. It will drop a lot of tannin, so IMHO it would be a mistake to use it in a low-tannin wine such as apricot. As we all know, Cab Sauv often (read always) has excess tannins, so it's much less likely to be damaged by agressive fining.

As to the full moon bit, can't speak to that, but I have heard that racking and fining should be done on a rising barometer. Any howling at the moon while racking in my experience has been the result of excessive testing for flaws...

aug, as far the the pectic enzyme, use it just as you would in the recipes. I usually increase the dose a little in finished wine. It won't hurt anything, and you should know in a couple of days if the problem is pectin.




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