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Edible Grape Leaves -- What's The Best Variety To Plant?


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#1 topekabill

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 01:05 AM

I'm wanting to grow a grape to use the leaves in Stuffed Grape Leaves recipies. I understand that Thompson's Seedless is generally used for this purpose, but it doesn't grow in Zone 5 where I live in Kansas. Any suggestions? Thanks

#2 DesertDance

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 08:45 AM

You can research and find the shapes of leaves for the different varieties, but they are all edible. I do love that Greek dish, Dolmadas with Olvgolimino Sauce, and I have roamed my vineyard searching for the best leaves to use. Some leaves are just too full of separations to work. The Tempranillo vine has great shaped leaves. They are big and their separations don't go in as deeply. The Cabernet and the Malbeck looks like they would work too. My vines are too new for me to be harvesting leaves. I'll wait till they are 4 or 5 years old. They need their leaves now for photosynthesis.

What grapes grow in your zone? I'd choose one with fewer, or less deep separations so the filling has less opportunities to fall through.

Good luck!
Suzi

#3 VanessaQ

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 02:31 PM

Funny this should come up! I was telling my husband last week that I have every intention of harvesting some leaves for dolmadas. I'll make them work!
Vanessa Q.
17 Gewurz vines, Some blackberries surviving in the test garden (no rasp or elder, alas).
Raspberry Hydromel and Viognier in secondary. WE LE Brunello,WE LE Trio Blanca and Luna Rossa are clarifying.
In various stages: Blackberry, blueberry, Malbec kit, Prickly pear, Joe's Ancient Orange, Mountain wildflower/mesquite mead, "fin" Apple/Pom,Skeeter Pee, blackberry melomel, chai tead, more blackberry melomel, hot chile wine, cherry limeade "Pee".

#4 bigadamsoy

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 03:11 PM

I'm wanting to grow a grape to use the leaves in Stuffed Grape Leaves recipies. I understand that Thompson's Seedless is generally used for this purpose, but it doesn't grow in Zone 5 where I live in Kansas. Any suggestions? Thanks

Baco Noir.
Adam White

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#5 mainebob

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 07:22 PM

OK Ladies,
How about your favorite recipe?
Bob
Chaplain Bob
Always making fruit wines from odd sources.Apple/grape/cherry,
Boysenberry/apple, pomegranate/blueberry, etc.
Bottle aging our first vintage from Valiant. "Prince Valiant the first '08"
Backyard vineyard with 75 vines. Mostly Swenson hybrids and MN
releases. Cold end of zone 4.

#6 DesertDance

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Posted 30 March 2010 - 09:57 PM

OK Ladies,
How about your favorite recipe?
Bob


_Yiayia's Dolmades_

1 lb. ground beef
1 large onion, chopped
1/2 c. white rice (not cooked)
1 egg
1/2 c. dry mint
1 T. butter, softened
1/2 bunch fresh parsley
dill, if convenient
3-4 T. lemon juice
salt
pepper
water, if needed

Knead all ingredients in a bowl. If the consistency is too hard, add
water, one tablespoon at a time (up to 4 T.).

Grape leaves are best picked from Grape Vines in the Spring, while they
are still tender. They can be washed and frozen between layers of waxed
paper and will keep for a year. They are also available in jars from
some fruit markets (especially ones that carry a lot of Greek/Italian
imported foods).

Depending on the size, you will need 20 to 40 grape leaves (Fila -
pronounced fee'-lah). Small leaves tend to be more tender.

Boil grape leaves until they are soft, but not tender. The time will depend
on the leaves. Fresh ones will only take a minute.

Fold grape leaves around small spoon fulls of meat mixture, sealing
completely.

In a large pot (preferably one with a large surface area on the bottom),
melt 1/2 stick (4 T.) butter. Arrange rolled dolmades on top. Do this
all at once, not as you roll them. Pour 3-4 cups water or chicken broth
over dolmades, cover, and simmer for 2 hours.

_Avgolemono_ (Don’t leave this out! This makes the whole thing rock!)
1 egg
3-4 T. lemon juice
corn starch

Separate egg. Whisk egg white mixed with 1 tsp. water; add yolk and mix.
Add corn starch (she gave no measurement) to lemon juice and stir; add
to egg mixture. Skim broth off dolmades (it is now a chicken/beef broth
and should be greatly reduced because of the rice) and add 1 T. at a time
to the egg mixture, whisking well. Egg mixture should thicken.

Remove dolmades from heat. Arrange dolmades in a bowl for serving. Mix
remaining broth into egg-lemon mixture. Stir well and pour over
dolmades.

#7 VanessaQ

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Posted 31 March 2010 - 09:00 AM

_Yiayia's Dolmades_


That looks good! My recipes are at home and I'm not but I haven't actually made them yet. I just have 2 or 3 to experiment with - and now one more. If I get a crazy amount of spare leaves this year, I'll do it and post.
Vanessa Q.
17 Gewurz vines, Some blackberries surviving in the test garden (no rasp or elder, alas).
Raspberry Hydromel and Viognier in secondary. WE LE Brunello,WE LE Trio Blanca and Luna Rossa are clarifying.
In various stages: Blackberry, blueberry, Malbec kit, Prickly pear, Joe's Ancient Orange, Mountain wildflower/mesquite mead, "fin" Apple/Pom,Skeeter Pee, blackberry melomel, chai tead, more blackberry melomel, hot chile wine, cherry limeade "Pee".

#8 mainebob

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 05:11 AM

Thanks,, Suzi,
Now I have something to do with the trimmings when I hack back the growth on my "Jelly Grapes"

Bob
Chaplain Bob
Always making fruit wines from odd sources.Apple/grape/cherry,
Boysenberry/apple, pomegranate/blueberry, etc.
Bottle aging our first vintage from Valiant. "Prince Valiant the first '08"
Backyard vineyard with 75 vines. Mostly Swenson hybrids and MN
releases. Cold end of zone 4.

#9 IVAN Z

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 08:09 AM

Yiayia'sYiayia's Dolmades? My wife’s recipe sounds very close to yours. But some small villages have a few different add-ins. Cabbage is my favorite way of dolmades…

#10 spoonful

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 07:30 PM

Double A vineyards says Jupiter is a good bet and it's ok in zone 5. I'm planting a few this spring. From Double A's website: "This early maturing blue variety has large berries on medium sized clusters. Fruit has a distinct muscat flavor. Great disease-resistant seedless! Grape leaves are great for stuffing"

#11 Chano Aguayo

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Posted 02 April 2010 - 11:16 AM

I'm wanting to grow a grape to use the leaves in Stuffed Grape Leaves recipies. I understand that Thompson's Seedless is generally used for this purpose, but it doesn't grow in Zone 5 where I live in Kansas. Any suggestions? Thanks









I have Ruby Red, Thompson seedless, Flame Seedless, and three other seedeless varieties whose canes grow over the fence that parallels a pedestrian walkpath. Frequently peaple ask me if they can pluck leaves for cooking for which I am very pleased to allow them to do. Some of the leaves are up to 8 inchses across and people are delighted to take as many as they want. This probably means that almost any variety of grape leaves may be good for cooking. Thanks.

Chano
Vineyard Prunology




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