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Tourtiere


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#1 Howie

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 05:32 AM

Tourtiere

Here's my Mom's recipe for Tortiere, which is a French Canadian meat pie. I believe she learned this from her father, who was a bricklayer and a great cook. I previously posted his recipes for baked beans and flapjacks.

2 large potatoes, peeled and cut up
#1 ground pork
1/2 cup finely chopped onion
1/2 cup beef broth
1 clove garlic, minced
1 bay leaf
1/4 tsp ginger
1/4 tsp cloves
(can also use 3/4 tsp sage in place of ginger/cloves)

Boil potatoes. Drain and mash. Brown pork. Drain off fat. Add remaining ingredients, except potatoes, plus 1/2 tsp salt and 1/2 tsp pepper. Cover and simmer 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Discard bay leaf. Add potatoes and cool this mixture. When cool, place in a pie shell, imbedded with thyme leaves. Imbed thyme leaves into top crust and cover pie, being sure to vent the top crust (Mom used to do this by making a stick type of Christmas tree). Bake at 400 degrees for 40 minutes, or until crust is golden brown. To prevent crust edges from browning too fast, cover edges with aluminum foil and then remove half way through cooking.
Best served with herbed, roasted carrots, a green salad and gherkin pickles.
Howie Hart

#2 NorthernWiner

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 10:50 AM

Sounds good, Howie. I might have to try this - but with a slight variation. I have a lot of corned beef in the freezer left over from St. Patty's day. I may rough chop it in the food processor, add the potatoes, and pick up the recipe from the assembly stage. I think the clove would also work with the corned beef (not sure about the ginger, though).

My mom used to make a lot of meat and potato pies, too, when I was a kid. I think a lot of us who live in the north grew up with regional variations of this dish.

Steve Kroll
President, Purple Foot Winemaking Club
"41 Years of Fine Winemaking"
www.purplefoot.org


Wine a little... and you'll feel much better!


#3 MinnesotaMaker

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 01:38 PM

Is it safe to assume that anything made by a bricklayer would hit the stomach like a bag of wet cement and carry you through most of the day before needing to re-fuel? I supposed he served his meals like he layed his bricks, one course at a time?

The recipe sounds good, I'll have to try it. How do you pronounce the name?

#4 Howie

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 10:09 PM

...The recipe sounds good, I'll have to try it. How do you pronounce the name?

tort TEE err.
Howie Hart




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