Jump to content


Photo

Leaking Corks


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 redazsun

redazsun

    Veteran Wine Maker

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 401 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Phoenix, AZ
  • Interests:Grand Children, Fast Cars, Wine Making, Friends

Posted 23 February 2010 - 07:46 PM

I bottled and corked 4 cases of Chardonnay Friday using synthetic corks for the first time. In the past I have always used 1+1 corks and never had a problem. I noticed a crease all the way up the side of the cork after being inserted into the bottle. After letting set upright over night I laid bottles on there side and they started leaking immediately. Sunday I pulled all 48 corks and re-corked with premium corks and laid on there side. Today they are leaking again. Due to the fact that 2 different types of corks have leaked I'm sure 1 of the plastic jaws is putting a groove in the cork and causing them to leak it just seams strange that I never had a problem with the 1+1 corks. Any body ever had the same problem? Do the Italian corkers with brass jaws work any better?
Ron Dickens

In Vino Veritas
John 15:5

#2 NorthernWiner

NorthernWiner

    One of the Regulars

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9627 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Twin Cities, MN
  • Interests:Wine (of course), travel, cooking, music, photography

Posted 23 February 2010 - 09:27 PM

There are several threads here mentioning the same problem - mostly with Nomacorcs. Like you, I also have a Portuguese corker. I've had mine for almost 10 years now and have used it on thousands of synthetic and natural corks. Not a single crease like others have mentioned. Considering I only paid about $35, I've been extremely happy with it.

Maybe the design has changed since I bought mine?

Steve Kroll
President, Purple Foot Winemaking Club
"41 Years of Fine Winemaking"
www.purplefoot.org


Wine a little... and you'll feel much better!


#3 Bar Barrique

Bar Barrique

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 984 posts
  • Location:Rural area in B.C.

Posted 23 February 2010 - 10:22 PM

I'm on my second Portuguese corker, and, while they are not perfect, I have not had a crease on the corks. I replaced the first one because the metal parts that actuate the plastic bits that squeeze the corks were spread out from use, and, my attempts to straighten them didn't work ( I replaced the plastic parts). The one thing I would add, is that if you are using natural corks you should wait approximately 2 weeks before laying the bottles down, although I would try to find out why your corker is creasing the corks. The part that pushes the corks into the bottles tends to bend, and, occasionally needs to be straightened, it can score the plastic jaws if it is too far out of alignment.

Bar

#4 redazsun

redazsun

    Veteran Wine Maker

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 401 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Phoenix, AZ
  • Interests:Grand Children, Fast Cars, Wine Making, Friends

Posted 24 February 2010 - 10:01 AM

Bar,
Can you elaborate on waiting 2 Weeks before laying bottles down?
Ron Dickens

In Vino Veritas
John 15:5

#5 Fishnwine

Fishnwine

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 618 posts
  • Location:Terrace B.C. Canada
  • Interests:Love to fish the Skeena river for salmon. Brew both beer and wine

Posted 24 February 2010 - 11:46 AM

There are several threads here mentioning the same problem - mostly with Nomacorcs. Like you, I also have a Portuguese corker. I've had mine for almost 10 years now and have used it on thousands of synthetic and natural corks. Not a single crease like others have mentioned. Considering I only paid about $35, I've been extremely happy with it.

Maybe the design has changed since I bought mine?

The only thing that has changed Steve is the line up guide for the bottle. It went from a adjustable one to a solid creased in the centre with a ring that centers the bottle.( I hope I describe that right.) The plasic jaws are not as thin on the corners as the brass jaws and so when they come together if the inside mechanisum is bent at all they can leave a crease.The Metal jawed one is a much better corker but it costs twice the price and sometimes more.I myself own and rent the portuguse floor corker I veiw them as easy to pay for do a very good job and disposible with out great loss if abused.
Robert Broome
Owner: Wine N Suds U-Brew & Home Brewing Supplies
www.winensuds.com
winesuds@telus.net
RJSpagnols Dealer

#6 Luc Volders

Luc Volders

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 953 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Rotterdam, the Netherlands
  • Interests:Winemaking bookbinding reading scubadiving Photography bycicle-riding cheesemaking

Posted 24 February 2010 - 01:33 PM

Bar,
Can you elaborate on waiting 2 Weeks before laying bottles down?


When bottling you compress the air that is in the top of the bottle.
That pressure has to even out.

So sometimes when bottling corks can pop up again....
Or they go only in with great effort, especially when using a hand corker.

Now by letting them stand up when just 'corked' you make sure that
no cork will pop out when lying down.
After a few days pressure will have settled and you can lay them down safely.

I personally think 2 weeks is a too long term for this. But certainly wait
for 3 to 5 days. Then again 2 weeks will do no harm.

Luc
Luc's wijnmaker web-log
or have a look at my girlfriends art:
The art of Els Mulder

#7 redazsun

redazsun

    Veteran Wine Maker

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 401 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Phoenix, AZ
  • Interests:Grand Children, Fast Cars, Wine Making, Friends

Posted 24 February 2010 - 01:53 PM

When bottling you compress the air that is in the top of the bottle.
That pressure has to even out.

So sometimes when bottling corks can pop up again....
Or they go only in with great effort, especially when using a hand corker.

Now by letting them stand up when just 'corked' you make sure that
no cork will pop out when lying down.
After a few days pressure will have settled and you can lay them down safely.

I personally think 2 weeks is a too long term for this. But certainly wait
for 3 to 5 days. Then again 2 weeks will do no harm.

Luc

I usually let stand for 1 or 2 days, thats why I was questioning the 2 weeks.
Ron Dickens

In Vino Veritas
John 15:5

#8 Bar Barrique

Bar Barrique

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 984 posts
  • Location:Rural area in B.C.

Posted 24 February 2010 - 08:36 PM

Funny thing; today I was bottling 2 kits, and, after about a dozen bottles the corker, which was not working all that well got worse. So I took it apart, and, straightened the V shaped metal part that pushes the jaws together. It is now working much better. This thing is only about 3 or 4 years old, though it has inserted many corks. I think that the problem is that agglomerate corks are much harder to squeeze than natural corks. I am probably going to have to replace this thing in the near future, but I am not sure that the plastic jaws are the "weak" link in the Portuguese corker. It seems to be the V shaped metal part that squeezes the plastic jaws together, so going to a corker with brass jaws may not solve the problem unless the corker has a sturdier mechanism for squeezing the corks.
As far as leaving the bottles standing for 2 weeks before laying them down; I seem to remember reading this years ago, but realistically I probably will not get around to laying the bottles down for at least 2 weeks.

Bar

#9 minooch

minooch

    Veteran Wine Maker

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 261 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:new canaan ct.
  • Interests:enjoy making wine. enjoy entering wine contests. bowhunting <br />for deer , small game hunting. cooking

Posted 24 February 2010 - 08:56 PM

Funny thing; today I was bottling 2 kits, and, after about a dozen bottles the corker, which was not working all that well got worse. So I took it apart, and, straightened the V shaped metal part that pushes the jaws together. It is now working much better. This thing is only about 3 or 4 years old, though it has inserted many corks. I think that the problem is that agglomerate corks are much harder to squeeze than natural corks. I am probably going to have to replace this thing in the near future, but I am not sure that the plastic jaws are the "weak" link in the Portuguese corker. It seems to be the V shaped metal part that squeezes the plastic jaws together, so going to a corker with brass jaws may not solve the problem unless the corker has a sturdier mechanism for squeezing the corks.
As far as leaving the bottles standing for 2 weeks before laying them down; I seem to remember reading this years ago, but realistically I probably will not get around to laying the bottles down for at least 2 weeks.

Bar

I have a problem with my portugese floor corker mine will cut a piece of cork when bottling i tried sanding the inside of the plastic jaws where i thought it was cutting the cork worked for a while but the same problem over and over again so i retired it and bought the italian floor corker what a difference better quality corks beautifully and it dosn't leave a dimple when it corks.



carmine

#10 rawlus

rawlus

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 564 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:milford, ma

Posted 25 February 2010 - 07:00 AM

i stay away from synthetic corks, i dont like the aesthetic and they are much harder on corking equipment because they compress less easily.

#11 Medsen Fey

Medsen Fey

    Fuselier

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2265 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fort Lauderdale, FL

Posted 25 February 2010 - 07:39 AM

I have a problem with an Italian corker that keeps pinching the corks. It has always done so at least to a mild degree, but it got worse. I've taken it apart and repositioned the pieces of the jaw to eliminate any gap and I'm still having the problem. I've only had it about 3 years, and I haven't put that many corks through it. I don't really know what to do next.
Lanne pase toujou pi bon.
(Past years are always better)

#12 smokinjoe359

smokinjoe359

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 888 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Niles, Ohio

Posted 25 February 2010 - 08:46 AM

I have a problem with an Italian corker that keeps pinching the corks. It has always done so at least to a mild degree, but it got worse. I've taken it apart and repositioned the pieces of the jaw to eliminate any gap and I'm still having the problem. I've only had it about 3 years, and I haven't put that many corks through it. I don't really know what to do next.

my italian corker gives me some problems from new.i took it apart and repositioned the jaws and used some thin shims to help eliminate it.works fine but i wish it was better.it sometimes leaves a line but no leakage.
Joe

#13 NorthernWiner

NorthernWiner

    One of the Regulars

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 9627 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Twin Cities, MN
  • Interests:Wine (of course), travel, cooking, music, photography

Posted 25 February 2010 - 09:17 AM

i stay away from synthetic corks, i dont like the aesthetic and they are much harder on corking equipment because they compress less easily.

Aesthetics aside, I haven't found there to be any compression issues with Nomacorcs. On the contrary, I used to buy #8 corks for belissima style dessert wine bottles, but have found that #9 Nomacorcs will compress down to that size opening without any problem.

Steve Kroll
President, Purple Foot Winemaking Club
"41 Years of Fine Winemaking"
www.purplefoot.org


Wine a little... and you'll feel much better!


#14 Fishnwine

Fishnwine

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 618 posts
  • Location:Terrace B.C. Canada
  • Interests:Love to fish the Skeena river for salmon. Brew both beer and wine

Posted 25 February 2010 - 11:42 AM

I have a problem with my portugese floor corker mine will cut a piece of cork when bottling i tried sanding the inside of the plastic jaws where i thought it was cutting the cork worked for a while but the same problem over and over again so i retired it and bought the italian floor corker what a difference better quality corks beautifully and it dosn't leave a dimple when it corks.



carmine

Have you tried lubricating the jaws with a food grade grease?
Robert Broome
Owner: Wine N Suds U-Brew & Home Brewing Supplies
www.winensuds.com
winesuds@telus.net
RJSpagnols Dealer

#15 minooch

minooch

    Veteran Wine Maker

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 261 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:new canaan ct.
  • Interests:enjoy making wine. enjoy entering wine contests. bowhunting <br />for deer , small game hunting. cooking

Posted 25 February 2010 - 03:33 PM

Have you tried lubricating the jaws with a food grade grease?



No but i will give it a try
carmine




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users