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#1 S Hofner

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 09:14 AM

I am working up a DIY bottle filler for my vac system. I know stainless steel is the best and cooper is not to be used, but what about brass. Can brass fittings be used on the wet side?
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#2 gregorio

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 10:46 AM

Plastic would be better. Brass is too reactive in the winemaking environments.
Perrucci Family Wines by Kennedy Hill Vineyards. Contact us regarding our monthly cork group buys.

#3 Hammered

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 11:47 AM

I don't disagree, however small amounts of contact with brass or copper can actually be a beneficial thing. In The Art and Science of Wine, Halliday and Johnson remark, "...one of the unsuspected consequences of the gradual replacement of brass by stainless-steel fittings may well prove to be an increase in sulfides and mercaptans." I think for the purposes you're talking about, a barbed brass fitting isn't going affect your wine much at all.

Howie has also cautioned us on the use of PVC for wine contact as well. I guess nothing's perfect.

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#4 gregorio

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 12:03 PM

I know what you are saying but that is a ludicrous claim they make. Any winemaker that needs to rely on the brass and copper fittings in his pump gear to help control sulfides and mercaptans should not be making wine. Maybe knitting is more their speed.

I was thinking more about SO2 interaction. Even some forms of stainless are not impervious to SO2 corrosion. PVC is really a horrible solution but I see it all the time in amatuer wineries. There are plenty of food safe plastics out there that will also stand up to harsh cleaning chemicals.

I don't disagree, however small amounts of contact with brass or copper can actually be a beneficial thing. In The Art and Science of Wine, Halliday and Johnson remark, "...one of the unsuspected consequences of the gradual replacement of brass by stainless-steel fittings may well prove to be an increase in sulfides and mercaptans." I think for the purposes you're talking about, a barbed brass fitting isn't going affect your wine much at all.

Howie has also cautioned us on the use of PVC for wine contact as well. I guess nothing's perfect.


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#5 Hammered

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 12:18 PM

So it sounds like your concerns would be more based on the fact that the brass would corrode from cleaning solutions and high acids of wine, which makes sense. I think their comment wasn't about encouraging the widespread use of brass, just anecdotally noting that S2 seems to have increased as the use of brass and copper has been replaced with SS.

It kind of relates to my industry, where the houses my Dad built in the 50's through the 70's are all still standing and in structurally great shape. Then in the 80's they brought in the Energy Codes. Dad's houses breathed and moisture came and went and things that got wet dried out on their own. Then we had to start building more air tight houses to save on energy and things started to rot from the insides. Much of my work now is designing and overseeing the repairs from the damages done from this unintended consequence of this "better idea". Even today, thirty years later, we're still trying to figure out new ways to meet this onerous code while managing the moisture. And Dad's houses continue have a simple, happy little smile.

Steve, Garagiste

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www.Catalyst-Manufacturing.com

Author of The Homebuilt Winery 

 

 




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