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#1 DoghouseCellars

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 01:34 PM

I wanted to see what type of spray programs people use in their vineyards. I have a small vineyard in Oregon and I am mostly concerned about keeping powdery mildew and botrytis in check. I have about 70 vines (40 pinot noir, 15 riesling, and 15 muscat. I am using a backpack sprayer. Most of the sprays from the agricultural supply stores come in sizes too large and cost more than I would like to spend.

Right now I have some lime sulfur, liquid sulfur, potassium bicarbonate, and serenade.

Here is what I have planned. I was going to spray with lime sulfur after pruning. Then alternate the liquid sulfur and potassium bicarbonate every two weeks for early season coverage. Use the serenade just before the grapes bunches tighten up. Finish up with potassium bicarbonate for the rest of the season.

I bought the potassium bicarbonate from my local wine supply shop and plan to mix it with some type of spreader sticker. I would also like to mix in some milk with the potassium bicarbonate. I hear that milk can help against fungus as well.

Any thoughts on how to do a small spray program on a budget would be appreciated.

#2 nwpinot

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 02:54 PM

It is really mild and damp both early and late in the season here in Oregon. I think that you might have trouble controlling PM and Botrytis by using the chemicals that you've listed.

You can keep track of the PM risk by signing onto OVS.com and follow the links to thier weather stations. There, you can get an idea of when your risk is mild/mod/high and modify your spray schedule accordingly. They have a weather station in Aurora, which sort of close to your place.

The liquid sulfur will work early in the season, but I would consider using a DMI or a strobularin product for PM. Use the risk assessment model to determine your PM spray schedule.

Elevate is what I would use for Botrytis. Spray it at bloom and at berry touch. Then spray periodically past verison. If you keep the foil pouches sealed, they will last for several seasons.

Also, Troutdale might be right at the edges of where grapes can be grown. You get late frosts routinely; the wind blows relentlessly. You might consider using late pruning (end of March) as a strategy to delay budbreak. You may also consider using a single highwire trellising and just let the shoots sprawl instead of using somthing like VSP... as the wind might just blow the "vertically positioned shoots" right out of your trellis!

#3 DoghouseCellars

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 03:55 PM

Yes, we do get the winds here. We have to strap down the patio furniture and duck when the cows go flying by. The winds are mostly in the winter time. I did VSP last year and did not have any issues. I might have had some frost problems so I will take you up on the late pruning advice. I looked up Sovran and liked what I saw. I would like to gradually add chemicals to my arsenal but keep them low impact.

#4 Hollywood Hill Vineyards

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 07:35 PM

I have a couple of acres here in the Seattle area which is similar to Oregon, but even wetter and cooler... I have no problem controlling PM and Botrytis with Sulfur, Sonata, Serenade and Potassium Bicarbonates. It's all about spray coverage and frequency. I have an Avatel weather station with a PM index built into it so I know when I need to spray. It also helps that I have a real air blast sprayer and get great coverage on my vines...

Steve Snyder
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www.hollywoodhillvineyards.com

 


#5 Hammered

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 10:19 PM

I have a couple of acres here in the Seattle area which is similar to Oregon, but even wetter and cooler... I have no problem controlling PM and Botrytis with Sulfur, Sonata, Serenade and Potassium Bicarbonates. It's all about spray coverage and frequency. I have an Avatel weather station with a PM index built into it so I know when I need to spray. It also helps that I have a real air blast sprayer and get great coverage on my vines...

Steve,

I'm closer to the water but probably have more breezes than you. Tell us more about your Avatel w/ PM index equipment. I'm committed to a better spray routine, but am starting to learn the basics.

Steve, Garagiste

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www.Catalyst-Manufacturing.com

Author of The Homebuilt Winery @ www.HomebuiltWinery.com

 

 

#6 DoghouseCellars

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 11:49 PM

The blast sprayer sounds good but probably out of my league for now.I spray as heavy as possible with the backpack sprayer which seems to leave a film on the leaves.What about an ATV sprayer? They have a small battery operated pump. Seems like the coverage would be better.

#7 Abraxas

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 07:23 AM

The blast sprayer sounds good but probably out of my league for now.I spray as heavy as possible with the backpack sprayer which seems to leave a film on the leaves.What about an ATV sprayer? They have a small battery operated pump. Seems like the coverage would be better.


It seems that as our ops grow and our economy of scale is polished, that the "boys with the most toys wins" runs so true. I'm not only a grape grower noob, but have a choose-n-cut Christmas tree op going, thousands of trees. My progression of rig purchases follows which has been directly related to the amount of plant material I've had to manage -

1. 3 gallon backpack sprayer - took care of about 1,700 trees and about 50 grapevines including weed control down the rows. What a pain!

2. Added a ATV pulled, 3.5 HP gas powered, FIMCO spray rig, 40 gal. needed as more material is planted. I use my lawn tractor to pull it. Make sure the battery operated types will give you the PSI you desire and only buy those with designated "Round-up Ready" roller pumps. After going thru 2 of the iron roller pumps, I learned the hard way. Glyphosate is very corrosive. I use my ATV rig for applying glyphosate, fungicides, and insecticides. You just rinse it well in between glyphosate applications.

3. Jacto Arbus PTO driven airblaster. Although 50 gals. is a little small for my needs, couldn't live without it. You just fill up more often. Notice the features, even including a hookup for a spray gun! The 2 gallon wash tank on the back really comes in handy out in the field. http://www.jacto.com.../arbus_200.html

Good luck,
Mark

#8 slowmo

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 05:14 PM

What product do people use for wettable sulfur? The only one I can buy without a license here in San Diego is the Lilly Miller product at the nursery. Is that going to be of sufficient strength?

#9 gregorio

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 07:28 PM

Thiolux or Microthiol. Cumulus if they still make it but it does not dispurse very well and needs a spreader/sticker to help out. I beleive all are roughly 80% sulfur. AFAIK, Lilly Miller does not make a wettable/flowable sulfur. Dust only.

What product do people use for wettable sulfur? The only one I can buy without a license here in San Diego is the Lilly Miller product at the nursery. Is that going to be of sufficient strength?


Perrucci Family Wines by Kennedy Hill Vineyards. Contact us regarding our monthly cork group buys.

#10 slowmo

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Posted 17 February 2010 - 09:23 PM

Thiolux or Microthiol. Cumulus if they still make it but it does not dispurse very well and needs a spreader/sticker to help out. I beleive all are roughly 80% sulfur. AFAIK, Lilly Miller does not make a wettable/flowable sulfur. Dust only.



Thanks. The Lilly Miller product was in a dust type container, but on the label it said it could be also be sprayed. with a mixture of 1 tablespoon per gallon. That seemed weak to me.

#11 Chano Aguayo

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 08:07 PM

What product do people use for wettable sulfur? The only one I can buy without a license here in San Diego is the Lilly Miller product at the nursery. Is that going to be of sufficient strength?









Try the following places: Peaceful Valley Farm and Garden Supply and Harmony Farm Supply. Both carry a good supply of products you can use. At HFS you can provide you a for for an exemption to purchase Serenade, and Sullfur. Both business can ship by mail. Speak directly with "Angie" from HFS for a personal consultaion. Thanks.

Chano
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