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What Type Of Grape To Plant


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#1 Leo Sperrazza

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Posted 22 November 2009 - 03:35 PM

I am considering purchasing some property in North East PA, it borders the Susquehanna River, I was pewviously a farm, I am wondering what types of grape would grow best in this climate, and take into consideration the water may flood the plants from time to time. Will grape vines survive flooding? ANy ideea where to look for addional info on soil suitability?

Thanks
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#2 Howie

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Posted 22 November 2009 - 05:54 PM

Northeast PA is near Erie, which is nowhere near the Susquehanna. I drive through Erie and Northeast from time to time and have relatives in Tunkhannock, which is on the Susquehanna. Probably 300 miles apart.
EDIT: Sorry, I was confused. You are talking about the northeastern part of PA. However, I would never plant grapes in a flood plain.
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#3 Leo Sperrazza

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Posted 23 November 2009 - 11:55 AM

Correct Northeastern part of Penna, not Northeast PA. I am just wondering if grape vines survive flood?
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#4 bret

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Posted 23 November 2009 - 12:55 PM

Not to be negative, but I would also never plant vines in a flood plain. You stand to lose your vines after all that time, energy, and money invested. I wouldn't even consider it in a plot with a shallow water table (water within 6 feet or so from the surface). -Bret
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#5 rpage53

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Posted 23 November 2009 - 01:00 PM

I would speak with a vineyard owner in your area.
http://www.pennsylva...om/Default.aspx

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#6 Crazy Run Ranch

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 09:33 AM

Every few years the Russian River flows over its banks and floods hundreds of acres of vines. Some muture vines even completely submerge with no damage to the vine or the coming years crop. But they are dormant at the time. If done during the growing season I'm sure it would be a mess. There's even a new winery called Floodgate in an area where flooding is common. They did build the winery on a hill smileytoast.gif

#7 Wade's Wines

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 11:40 AM

I've sure read that vines don't like wet feet. I suppose it would depend on how long they were under and what time of year, as Crazy Run Ranch points out. Of course, his grapes are in CA and they might appreciate a good soaking there more than they would in PA. If it was warm and sunny afterwards, vs. cold and damp, it could make a huge difference on disease pressure. And if his sunny spot is sandy soil that hardly holds moisture and yours is clay that hardly releases moisture once it's saturated, that would make a huge difference.
Personally, I'd avoid a flood plain.
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#8 DesertDance

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 02:12 PM

Well, if you are anything like me, you'll plant them in those big cloth containers, then move them when a flood comes! I'm space deficient, so I plant some in containers, and they do just fine. The cloth containers rock. They give aeration and allow the roots to spread, not circle. Google it. http://www.rootmaker...ainers.php#jump

#9 PAwine-o

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 02:03 PM

I think you'll like this (at least I do):

www.dcnr.state.pa.us/topogeo/maps/map7.pdf

The just check out your USDA Zone. That should help you to narrow your choices.
Duct tape'll fix it!

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10 gal cab sauv from grapes.

#10 D&S

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 08:09 AM

Leo,

There is a Mid-Atlantic Grape Growers Guide available on line that I've found helpful: http://www.ces.ncsu....rces/winegrape/
I believe there is a newer version available for a fee but this one is free. Also visit Bruce Zoecklein's site at Virginia Tech. He sometimes deals with mid-Atlantic topics. Regarding vinifera varieties, you see a fair amount of Cab franc here along with some Cab Sauv. Among the hybrids, Chambourcin seems prevalent.

I don't want to discourage you from seeking out the PA extension services or local wineries, but here in SE PA, I have found them to be useless.



#11 Chano Aguayo

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 07:16 PM

I am considering purchasing some property in North East PA, it borders the Susquehanna River, I was pewviously a farm, I am wondering what types of grape would grow best in this climate, and take into consideration the water may flood the plants from time to time. Will grape vines survive flooding? ANy ideea where to look for addional info on soil suitability?

Thanks





First of all, grapes do not like "wet feet" I too handled a mature vineyard flooded by tributaries of the Russian River on those heavy rainy years and paddled a canoe occasionally over the vineyard to move heavy floating logs away from the vineyard so these would not rest on the vines and trellis wires once water receded. After the rainy days were over, had to pump any standing water out of the vineyard to prevent excess canopy growth and allow cultural preactices with equipment.

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