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How To Raise Ph?


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#1 Calamity Cellars

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Posted 07 October 2009 - 09:41 AM

I need to raise pH in my zinfandel from 3.2 to the 3.5-3.6 range. I know this is done with either calcium carbonate but how do I do it? I have 4 carboys full of wine but want to keep them separate because they were oaked differently. (one with French, one with American, one with Hungarian, and one with no oak.)

Alan Holtzheimer


Silver Bell Winery


#2 NorthernWiner

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Posted 07 October 2009 - 09:47 AM

Don't use calcium carbonate on finished wine. Potassium carbonate/bicarbonate is a better choice. Your best bet is to use it during cold stabilization.

Some good info here:
http://www.fallbrigh...Bicarbonate.htm

Steve Kroll
President, Purple Foot Winemaking Club
"41 Years of Fine Winemaking"
www.purplefoot.org


Wine a little... and you'll feel much better!


#3 Calamity Cellars

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 06:58 PM

I have made my purchase of potassium carbonate and I am reading the instructions Steve provided but I have questions.

The instructions say that 3.4 g/gal will yield a 0.1% change in acidity. I remember when lowering pH the advice is to forget TA and adjust for pH only. So is this true when raising pH as well? I believe so. The advice I received on my Zin was to raise pH to 3.5 not to lower TA. I understand they move in parallel but how does the 0.1% change correlate to pH change? Should I go for the 3.4 g/gal and then see where it ends up or go for more considering I want pH to jump form 3.2 to 3.5?

""The procedure for using potassium bicarbonate is also simple. It is added in a single dose to the entire batch of wine, rather than in serial addition recommended for calcium carbonate and Acidex. Addition of 3.4 grams/gallon will reduce acidity by 0.1% with a maximum reduction of Total Acid (TA) of 0.25 to 0.3% ""

Alan Holtzheimer


Silver Bell Winery


#4 Calamity Cellars

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 07:09 PM

And another question. The Zin is being stored in a 55 F cellar. I have it in four carboys. Should I add the KHCO3 to all four and then cycle them through the fridge (I can only fit two) or add to two and shill then add to the next two when fridge space becomes available?

Alan Holtzheimer


Silver Bell Winery


#5 Andy in SoCal

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 09:21 PM

Very generally, ph moves the same as TA; if ph goes up 0.1, TA goes down 0.1.

If you want my advice, forget about TA and just focus on PH.

And do bench trials. 3.4 g/G may, or may not, reduce TA/increase ph by 0.1. Depends on your wine.

You may taste the pot carb at 6.8 or 10.2 g/G, or otherwise dislike the result at those levels, so you want to know before-hand what the result will taste like.

Also, I'd cold stabilize the wine first, before pot carb, to see if you can raise the ph enough that way.

Lastly, I did a zin 4 years ago that came in at 3.0 ph. I was able to bump it up to about 3.2 with pot carb, but never could get MLF to go.

And now, everyone loves that dam wine. I'm pre-conditioned to be less than happy with it, considering all the pain it caused me, but everyone else who's only involvement is drinking it loves it!

Let us know how it comes out!

Andy
Andy Coradeschi
Cellarmasters Home Wine Making Club
www.CellarmastersLA.org

"Wine is light, held together by water." Galileo




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