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#16 Rich Wines

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 08:17 AM

QUOTE (Rich Wines @ May 17 2009, 04:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
For anyone interested in making a similar press, I have cleared-up the documentation, corrected some sizes, clarified others and cleand-up some inconsistencies. Also improved my creation of PDF files! I will be using the press in a couple of weeks for my Chilean grapes. I have 360 lbs. crushed & de-stemmed in buckets in freezer and friges getting cold-soaked.





Thanks for your interest,
Richard

Finished pressing my Chilean grapes yesterday. Pressed 360 lbs. and did not do a second pressing of the pumice this time. With the SG at 1.000, I still had a heavy cap on the must and carefully scooped off the cap into buckets and broke it down into 4 pressings. By limiting the amount of each pressing I was able to get good extraction without having to break-up the pumice and press again. I poured-off the rest of the must into another clean fermenter and left the heavy sediment that was on the bottom. Got about 35 gallons that will be going into carboys by tomorrow and expect to loose another gallon or two in that transfer.

The press held up just fine with heavy hydraulic jack pressure. I noted that when the jacking gets hard, if you leave it for a few minutes, it will become easy again for another couple of strokes. It did take awhile to get that “last drop” out of the must. The pressed juice tasted great for this early in the process. However, I can recommend a change to anyone building a similar press, or any press for that matter. I would increase the height of the press (currently 54.5 inches) by another 4 or 5 inches to allow for additional height over the basket. With the current height, I can barely get a 5 gallon bucket horizontal when loading the press and the additional height will give you more working room.

Richard


#17 Hammered

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 09:17 AM

QUOTE (Rich Wines @ Jun 3 2009, 07:49 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Finished pressing my Chilean grapes yesterday. Pressed 360 lbs. and did not do a second pressing of the pumice this time. With the SG at 1.000, I still had a heavy cap on the must and carefully scooped off the cap into buckets and broke it down into 4 pressings. By limiting the amount of each pressing I was able to get good extraction without having to break-up the pumice and press again. I poured-off the rest of the must into another clean fermenter and left the heavy sediment that was on the bottom. Got about 35 gallons that will be going into carboys by tomorrow and expect to loose another gallon or two in that transfer.

The press held up just fine with heavy hydraulic jack pressure. I noted that when the jacking gets hard, if you leave it for a few minutes, it will become easy again for another couple of strokes. It did take awhile to get that “last drop” out of the must. The pressed juice tasted great for this early in the process. However, I can recommend a change to anyone building a similar press, or any press for that matter. I would increase the height of the press (currently 54.5 inches) by another 4 or 5 inches to allow for additional height over the basket. With the current height, I can barely get a 5 gallon bucket horizontal when loading the press and the additional height will give you more working room.

Richard

Sounds like fun! It's always hard to hear you guys talking about the southern hemisphere grapes this time of year. There's no one out here that I know of that imports anything but table grapes.

That top bar tip is a good one. Even mine with 61" clearance above the floor is a little restrictive being able to pour a 5 gallon bucket into the basket, and with mine getting the drive shaft and press plate out would be hard with less room than that. Most of the time, I scoop the must directly from the fermenter into the basket with a kitchen pan a gallon at a time (+/-).

Steve, Garagiste

Manufacturer of IntelliTanks at
www.Catalyst-Manufacturing.com

Author of The Homebuilt Winery @ www.HomebuiltWinery.com

 

 

#18 mokadir

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 10:07 AM

My vertical supports are about 60" also. I think that I have ~ 20" or so from top of basket to top cross member. This seems to be enough, but I usually use a 2-3 quart kitchen sauce pot to do my transfers from my fermenters, instead of a 5 gal bucket. At the end, I had enough room to pick up the 30gal Brute and dump the leftovers in as well. Using the smaller transfer pan seems to give the wine plenty of time to find its way through the basket without overflowing my 3" pan.

Have fun with the wines. My Carmenere from last year came out great after spending 9 months in a french oak barrel. I will probably add a bit of cab and merlot in there to add just a bit of complexity.
Bob
2014: Red Hills Cab, Yakima Merlot, Muscato d'Asti style, Inlaws Bordeaux blend
2013 awaiting Barrel: Yakima Syrah, Gren/PS for Rhone blending
BARRELING: friends CV OV Zin 13, Inlaws Bordeaux Blend 13, Yakima Sangiovese 13
Awaiting bottle: Lake County Montepulciano 12, Yakima Pinot Noir 12

#19 RSG

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    what if I just tweek it once more...

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 02:31 PM

QUOTE (Rich Wines @ Jun 3 2009, 09:49 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
However, I can recommend a change to anyone building a similar press, or any press for that matter. I would increase the height of the press (currently 54.5 inches) by another 4 or 5 inches to allow for additional height over the basket. With the current height, I can barely get a 5 gallon bucket horizontal when loading the press and the additional height will give you more working room.

Richard

Good going Richard.

It's funny, I took a closer look at your press and that's the way I've been designing mine too, with the jack under the basket. I think thats a great way to reduce space. You've done a fantastic job on yours. I found a way to avoid the overhead space issue by making my press bar swing out of the way. Since mine will be made from steel I can make a sleeve and locking system.
Ron Gardiner

#20 Colorado-Jef

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 04:55 PM

where did you find the 12" diameter pvc pipe? I have been looking and can't find anything that large.

#21 Rich Wines

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 08:23 PM

Jef - you have to check around with all major pluming concerns and construction job sites for scrapes. Look up a supplier of pipes – PVC, storm drain, well casings, water lines etc. and stop by and ask around. Keep your eye open for water-line installation projects around town. The only other choice would be to buy a 10 to 20 foot section and split the cost with others. I got my section of 12 inch well casing from a construction company equipment yard. The company was big in doing storm drains, sewage transfer stations and reservoir water transmission lines. The pipe I found is actually food safe!

If you can manage to make the metal straps to hold together a wooden slat basket, the wood-work should not be that hard of the effort to complete the basket - as an alternative.

Good Luck,
Richard


#22 mokadir

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Posted 03 June 2009 - 09:01 PM

QUOTE (Rich Wines @ Jun 3 2009, 10:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Jef - ...

If you can manage to make the metal straps to hold together a wooden slat basket, the wood-work should not be that hard of the effort to complete the basket - as an alternative.

Good Luck,
Richard



FWIW, the straps that I used are 1" x 48" cold steel available at Home Depot and Lowe's. I think they were about ~$5. I did not need to do metalworking, although I thought about brazing it or having someone weld it into a hoop. I just drilled holes and bent it by hand and it is kept together using screws. Good luck.
Bob
2014: Red Hills Cab, Yakima Merlot, Muscato d'Asti style, Inlaws Bordeaux blend
2013 awaiting Barrel: Yakima Syrah, Gren/PS for Rhone blending
BARRELING: friends CV OV Zin 13, Inlaws Bordeaux Blend 13, Yakima Sangiovese 13
Awaiting bottle: Lake County Montepulciano 12, Yakima Pinot Noir 12

#23 Rich Wines

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Posted 21 June 2009 - 08:28 AM

QUOTE (Rich Wines @ Jun 3 2009, 10:49 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Finished pressing my Chilean grapes yesterday. Pressed 360 lbs. and did not do a second pressing of the pumice this time. With the SG at 1.000, I still had a heavy cap on the must and carefully scooped off the cap into buckets and broke it down into 4 pressings. By limiting the amount of each pressing I was able to get good extraction without having to break-up the pumice and press again. I poured-off the rest of the must into another clean fermenter and left the heavy sediment that was on the bottom. Got about 35 gallons that will be going into carboys by tomorrow and expect to loose another gallon or two in that transfer.

The press held up just fine with heavy hydraulic jack pressure. I noted that when the jacking gets hard, if you leave it for a few minutes, it will become easy again for another couple of strokes. It did take awhile to get that “last drop” out of the must. The pressed juice tasted great for this early in the process. However, I can recommend a change to anyone building a similar press, or any press for that matter. I would increase the height of the press (currently 54.5 inches) by another 4 or 5 inches to allow for additional height over the basket. With the current height, I can barely get a 5 gallon bucket horizontal when loading the press and the additional height will give you more working room.

Richard


Some have asked about adding a pressure gauge to a hydraulic jack operated press to be able to monitor pressing pressure. The following link will take you to a hydraulic jack modification process that adds a pressure gauge to a jack:

http://www.albroswift.com/jack.htm

Here are the instructions without the pictures (go to above link to get full article with pictures):

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Adding a pressure gauge to a hydraulic jack
Messy shop project. Idea copied off one of my pyro mentor’s website.
Picked a 12 ton press off craigslist, first thing I had to do was add a pressure gauge.
First thing, drain the fluid and tear it down. Wearing latex gloves and getting hydraulic fluid everywhere is a good reason not to touch the digital camera for this phase of the operation, but just picture the mess and then triple it!
After thoroughly cleaning the base, the setup begins:
Drill a 3/16 hole about 1-1/2” in, centering in the meat of the base, on the side opposite the rest of the ports.
then open the hole up to 5/16 for the first ¾”. Then run a 1/8” pipe thread tap in.
Clamp the base flat, connect the dots:

Now clean ‘er again, and reassemble, (where did those little parts go?) making note of the diameter of the piston base.

I used a hydraulic “Z” fitting, only rated up to 6000 PSI, probably re-plumb at a later date for full pressure. Anyway, passed the pressure test (the second time around)

Reason for measuring the piston diameter, to make a conversion for hydraulic pressure to lbs of force. Piston dia = 1.75 inches, giving me an area of a bit over 2.40 sq inches. At 6000 PSI gauge the force would equal about 14,400 lbs. to test my math, at 10,000 psi it figures to 24,053 lbs, probably not a coincidence it’s a 12 ton jack. Now it's time to figure out how to get hydraulic fluid out of my hair.

Pressure conversion chart (see web site) for conversion chart. You must measure your jack piston while you have it apart to come up with a pressure conversion factor.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I plan on adding a pressure gauge to my 6 ton jack to prevent over-pressing and for repeatable press results.

Richard


#24 Hammered

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Posted 21 June 2009 - 09:51 AM

QUOTE (Rich Wines @ Jun 21 2009, 08:00 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Some have asked about adding a pressure gauge to a hydraulic jack operated press to be able to monitor pressing pressure. The following link will take you to a hydraulic jack modification process that adds a pressure gauge to a jack:

http://www.albroswift.com/jack.htm

Here are the instructions without the pictures (go to above link to get full article with pictures):

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Adding a pressure gauge to a hydraulic jack
Messy shop project. Idea copied off one of my pyro mentor’s website.
Picked a 12 ton press off craigslist, first thing I had to do was add a pressure gauge.
First thing, drain the fluid and tear it down. Wearing latex gloves and getting hydraulic fluid everywhere is a good reason not to touch the digital camera for this phase of the operation, but just picture the mess and then triple it!
After thoroughly cleaning the base, the setup begins:
Drill a 3/16 hole about 1-1/2” in, centering in the meat of the base, on the side opposite the rest of the ports.
then open the hole up to 5/16 for the first ¾”. Then run a 1/8” pipe thread tap in.
Clamp the base flat, connect the dots:

Now clean ‘er again, and reassemble, (where did those little parts go?) making note of the diameter of the piston base.

I used a hydraulic “Z” fitting, only rated up to 6000 PSI, probably re-plumb at a later date for full pressure. Anyway, passed the pressure test (the second time around)

Reason for measuring the piston diameter, to make a conversion for hydraulic pressure to lbs of force. Piston dia = 1.75 inches, giving me an area of a bit over 2.40 sq inches. At 6000 PSI gauge the force would equal about 14,400 lbs. to test my math, at 10,000 psi it figures to 24,053 lbs, probably not a coincidence it’s a 12 ton jack. Now it's time to figure out how to get hydraulic fluid out of my hair.

Pressure conversion chart (see web site) for conversion chart. You must measure your jack piston while you have it apart to come up with a pressure conversion factor.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I plan on adding a pressure gauge to my 6 ton jack to prevent over-pressing and for repeatable press results.

Richard

Wow, that's out of my league, but intriguing!

Steve, Garagiste

Manufacturer of IntelliTanks at
www.Catalyst-Manufacturing.com

Author of The Homebuilt Winery @ www.HomebuiltWinery.com

 

 

#25 RSG

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    what if I just tweek it once more...

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Posted 21 June 2009 - 08:39 PM

Richard, just awesome. I didn't know you could add a pressure gauge to a bottle jack. I just bougtht an 8 Ton yesterday. I would have gotten the 6 Ton as you mentioned but they didn't have any in stock. Since I too have a machine shop I'll be sure to retro fit my jack with a gauge. Only problem is I have a part still in the mill that's been dialed in for a month or so but no time to finish it and don't want to pull it. I still have several cuts left.

Thanks for posting that info.
Ron Gardiner

#26 twiggins

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Posted 07 July 2009 - 03:32 PM

QUOTE (Rich Wines @ May 15 2009, 11:36 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
OK - added more pictures. Still unable to attach the Excel file so if you need, send me you email address. The PDF files are not nearly as good as the original and you have to view them at least at 150X or some of the dotted lines will look like solid lines. Don't know is the PDF basket hole template will print out correctly to use as drill pattern. The Material List has detailed assembly instructions and operating instructions. Also, the Press Detail Layouts have comments to help out. Dont hesitate to email questions.

Pictures look to be all over the place - here goes!

[attachm
ent=9682:Ready_to_Load.JPG][at
t
achment=9691:Ready_fo...e_Plates.JPG][attachment=
9
694:Ready_fo...m_Plates.JPG]


TW

#27 twiggins

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Posted 07 July 2009 - 03:41 PM

Richard,
You did an outstanding job in designing and building your press. I would love to build one for myself. Can you still send the excel file?
TW

#28 Tomer1

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 05:02 AM

I found a source of HDPE pipes which I hope they will agree to help since they usually supply to multi milion dollar water and gas lining projects.
They are the only ones who carry pipes over 315mm in diameter.
They have 710 and 800, the thickness is about 14-16mm which I plan to drill.
I might also order a smaller diameter pipe to be able to apply more pressure for the mock ice wine Im planning using cyro technique.

Have you find this type of matirial to be as safe as metal in the long run in terms of chemicals leaching out and nasties.

Perf SS is very expensive by itself before the bending and the closing machenism welding which I want done, It may cost me up to 350$ which is alot more then im willing to pay.

If I were into tatoos... I would tatoo some grapes on my forarm. :P


#29 Rich Wines

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 08:28 AM

I found a source of HDPE pipes which I hope they will agree to help since they usually supply to multi milion dollar water and gas lining projects.
They are the only ones who carry pipes over 315mm in diameter.
They have 710 and 800, the thickness is about 14-16mm which I plan to drill.
I might also order a smaller diameter pipe to be able to apply more pressure for the mock ice wine Im planning using cyro technique.

Have you find this type of matirial to be as safe as metal in the long run in terms of chemicals leaching out and nasties.

Perf SS is very expensive by itself before the bending and the closing machenism welding which I want done, It may cost me up to 350$ which is alot more then im willing to pay.

If you can find out where all of the local water & gas projects are active, you can drive by the construction sites and beg for scrapes. There are usually some cut sections and ends that end up in a scrap heap. I included an Excel file in earlier posts that has a drill pattern that overlays around a 12" diameter pipe that you can modify for other diameters.

I find that when pressing with full basket loads, the center of the cake still contains some juice that can be gotten out by breaking up/mixing the cake and pressing again. I usually press in smaller batches and do it only once. As far as Ice-wines, you can achieve the same higher extractions by pressing multiple small loads.

Richard

#30 Tomer1

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 12:25 PM

There is no gas delivery system in israel as of today, gas is supplied by pressurized steel tanks to each house hold.
There is currently a national gas pipe project on the go dou to end in 2011,they use a 30` 12mm thick steel pipe by mannesmann,its a massive pipe.
The cities rarly use plastic for water or sewage lines ,its usually 50-60` concrete pipes with rubber pressure joints.
This is why im excited to finally find a company which manufactures and sells plastic pipes in such large diameters In the email send I offered them a few bottles as bribe, I hope it will convince them to sell.
I want to get one 710\800mm as my standart basket and one smaller 220mm for pressing frozen grapes\fruit.

If I were into tatoos... I would tatoo some grapes on my forarm. :P





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