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Professional Winemaking Yeasts Now Available From Vintners Harvest


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#1 Jon Graber

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 10:44 AM

Professional Winemaking Yeasts Now Available

Vintner's Harvest proudly offer a complete range of professional winemaking products including winemaking yeast strains that have never before been available to the home wine making enthusiast.

Please link to
http://www.brewcraft...p;idDetails=619 for general info on strains to use for varietal grape wines.
http://www.brewcraft...p;idDetails=623 for detailed info on strains for red wines.
http://www.brewcraft...p;idDetails=622 for detailed info on strains for white wines.
http://www.brewcraft...p;idDetails=620 for detailed info on strains for fruit and vegetable wines.

...and once at our website, please browse around to find other helpful information regarding these strains' use and wine making generally.

New yeast strains isolated

New strains of wine yeast are continuously being isolated and adopted by commercial vineyards but, as with so much regarding winemaking, they remain a closely guarded secret. Vintner’s Harvest entered into an exclusive yeast strain screening program with a leading yeast and ingredient supplier to the European commercial winemaking industry. This program considered only specialist wine yeast strains used commercially in Europe and identified a complete wine yeast range for all varieties of Grape, Fruit and Vegetables. The screening process involved 3,000 separate fermentations over a two year period.

Selecting the right strain for your wine

You will note from the charts that several yeast strains may be suitable for the same ingredient, the number of stars indicate its general suitability ie. 3 stars are more suitable than 1 star. The separate yeast description provides you with further detailed information about each specific strain, this is especially useful where more than one strain has 3 stars and you may even decide that the qualities offered by a yeast with less stars match what you desire for your wine.
Vintner’s Harvest will continue to unveil new and innovative products to the home winemaker to ensure you have available to you every important ingredient at a quality equal to that available to the commercial winemaker.

Cheers, and Good Fermenting,

Vintners Harvest


#2 Medsen Fey

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 02:13 PM

This sounds wonderful - are these yeast available in 5-10 gram packets suitable for home winemakers? If so, I have not run across them at any of the online retailers I frequent.

Medsen
Lanne pase toujou pi bon.
(Past years are always better)

#3 Jon Graber

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 10:16 AM

Yes, they are so new that many retailers have not yet heard of them, or stocked them yet. These new strains of dried yeast are packed in 8 gm sachets. Please inquire with your local retailer for these strains which can be ordered from BrewcraftUSA (wholesale only, www.brewcraft.net)
Thank you for your interest and enthusiasm for these new strains. Please let us know when you have found and fermented with them, and let us know about your results!
If you continue to have difficulty in sourcing them, please contact us directly at info@brewcraft.net and we will help you find a retailer near you.
Cheers,
Jon Graber, BrewcraftUSA, LLP

#4 Medsen Fey

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Posted 06 April 2009 - 10:40 AM

I sent this e-mail in 1 week ago. As of yet, I have received no reply. Does anyone know where these products are available?

QUOTE
Your products were posted on winepress.us forums and I was informed that your yeast products are available in packages sized for home brewing (8 grams). I would like to know where I can order them from. I live in Fort Lauderdale Florida; zip code is XXXXX. Since there are no local homebrew stores in this area, I order online and I am happy to order from any retailer that has your products available in stock. Will you please provide me with a source to order from?

Secondly, I have a few technical questions. On your website, it suggests that your yeast should not be rehydrated prior to pitching. All ADY that I have encountered previously have benefited greatly from rehydration at the proper temperature (around 104 F) and I am accustomed to using products such as GoFerm which I have found shorten the lag phase and improve maximal alcohol tolerance. Without detailing any trade secrets, are your yeasts dried in some different manner that makes them perform differently from other dried yeast?

I often ferment fruit wines and meads (honey-wine)and have to use nutrients on a regular basis. Do you have information documenting the relative nutrient needs of these strains. I'd like to have an estimate of the YAN required so that I can plan an appropriate recipe.

I see you include some information on pH for strains which don't do as well below 3.2. The management of pH is critical in mead making due to the low buffering capacity of honey musts. Can your provide details on the pH tolerance of the various strains? Other than SN9, which yeast tolerate low pH the best?

In Florida, temperature control is always an issue. Which yeast strains can produce the least amount of fusel alcohols (and other odor causing compounds) when fermenting at temperatures above 75-80 F?

Is one of your strains a Prise de Mousse?

I apologize if I have asked more than my allowed allotment of questions, but I will share this information with fellow mead/wine makers which may save you from having to repeatedly answer them.

Thanks in advance,

Lanne pase toujou pi bon.
(Past years are always better)

#5 Jon Graber

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Posted 07 April 2009 - 12:02 PM

QUOTE (Medsen Fey @ Apr 6 2009, 10:12 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I sent this e-mail in 1 week ago. As of yet, I have received no reply. Does anyone know where these products are available?

Hello Medsen,
Not sure where you sent your original inquiry with the technical questions, but we did not receive. I am working on getting those questions answered and will respond again, ASAP. Meantime, as I had mentioned previously, please inquire with your local retailer who can order Vintners Harvest Yeast for you. Or contact us at info@brewcraft.net, tell us where you are located, and we will connect you directly with a retailer.
Cheers,
Jon Graber

#6 rpage53

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Posted 07 April 2009 - 01:35 PM

I'd like to know about your MA33 malolactic yeast. Is this a genetically modified product?

Thanks,
Rick.

#7 deb_rn

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Posted 08 April 2009 - 09:04 AM

So, we can't actually ORDER it from you? Weird!


Debbie
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#8 Jon Graber

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Posted 08 April 2009 - 10:14 AM

Hi Debbie,

Not so weird, we're a manufacturing/import/distribution wholesaler only. We supply a couple thousand retailers, breweries, wineries and distilleries and support them by not under-selling or with direct sales to individuals. We want to help them stay in business, not take away their business.

In answer to a couple of other questions that have come up, sent directly to me: No, none of these strains/products are certified Kosher; none of them are GMO (genetically modified organisms), either.

Two retailers whom you may contact now for these strains are:

Bader Beer and Wine Supplies
Vancouver WA
www.baderbrewing.com

Main Street Homebrew Supply Co.
Hillsboro, OR
www.mainbrew.com

But please encourage you own favorite or local retailers to carry them, too. This is why we support www.winepress.us with our ad dollars, and how we hope to eventually get these new strains in the hands (and fermenters) of many wine makers across the country.

Thank you all again for your support and interest in our products.

Cheers,
Jon



#9 Jon Graber

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Posted 16 April 2009 - 04:12 PM

Our apologies for the delay in our reply to your 8th April queries,

The main reason why Vintners Harvest Wine Yeasts should not be rehydrated is because each sachet also contains essential trace vitamins and minerals (to ensure fermentation rate is determined by total Nitrogen level rather than some trace deficiency – that’s a long story!) which would nullify any rehydration benefit. Interestingly, contrary to majority of literature from other yeast brands our own Biostat fermentations and microbiology show no benefit to viable cell count and no reduction to lag phase time with rehydration. We also did some innovative work with SEM (scanning electron miscroscopy) to demonstrate cell condition is actually improved as is budding rate where dried yeast is pitched directly. The only benefit to rehydration was found in ethanol ceiling fermentation trials where circa 30% of strains did reach a slightly higher ceiling but the differences were less than 0.2% ABV (to ceiling not yield!) and only where fermenting above 18.0% ABV.

Your question about YAN is certainly an interesting one and could take some pages to properly address – but the bottom line is that it is almost impossible to control total nitrogen (total nitrogen is a better measure than YAN because the YAN measure does not account for that % of nitrogen which cannot be assimilated by the yeast) because the natural content can vary by as much as 150% year on year.

A greater problem than total Nitrogen content is that currently the majority of fermentations are limited by availability of trace vitamins and minerals such that ‘no matter’ how much Nitrogen is present, the rate of fermentation will be limited where particular trace nutrients are absent. Vintners Harvest removes this problem by introducing pure trace nutrition. Understanding which congeners the yeast produce when trace nutrient is limiting is an area of special knowledge to Brewcraft but suffice to say that wines made using Vintners Harvest Wine Yeast are better in quality because remove this ‘trace nutrient limiting factor’.

As a general rule of thumb, we’d recommend addition of 20 grams Diammonium Phosphate per 23 Litre fermentation to the majority of table wine strength country wine recipes where VH yeasts are used – for high alcohol fermentations we’d recommend Wyeast Yeast Nutrient rather than straight DAP.

For pH – all wine yeast strains demonstrate increased congener (off-flavour) production where the pH is below 3.0 so whilst some strains (such as VH bayanus strains) will ferment out even at pH 2.8 it is always preferable to adjust pH upwards to ideally within the 3.2 – 3.5 range. Have you tried the addition of Trisodium Citrate to resolve the mead problem? It will work ie it’ll shift pH without influencing acidity.

As with pH, high temperature always leads to increased congener production and for ultimate wine quality it is always preferable to ferment within the 20 – 25C range. Where temperature control is not possible, then again go for one of the Bayanus strains.

CL23 is perfect for Prise de Mousse.

Again, apologies this was a little time in coming and please don’t hesitate if you have any further questions,

Cheers, the Technical Support Team at Brewcraft/Vintner's Harvest


#10 Medsen Fey

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Posted 17 April 2009 - 07:35 AM

Wow.
Thanks for the detailed reply. I find the "no rehydration" fascinating. Though I must confess that I will probably remain a bit skeptical until I try side by side batches for myself.

I regularly use products such a Fermaid K and yeast extract to provide nutrients other than ammonia nitrogen to ensure good fermentation.

I have not tried trisodium Citrate - you've given me something to read up on.

I did order yeast from Bader Brewing which worked fine, and I should have them here in a couple of days. I'm excited about giving them a try.

Thank you,

Medsen
Lanne pase toujou pi bon.
(Past years are always better)

#11 Jon Graber

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 04:53 PM

Hello again Medsen- here is more from our Technical Support Team in response to your latest inquiry:

On the question about yeast strain Nitrogen requirements, I’m afraid this is not that straightforward! Other than to say for ultimate wine quality the fermentation system should contain ‘an excess’ of trace nutrition (excess can still mean below 1 gram per 23 litre fermentation providing the product contains all trace vitamins and minerals and magnesium sulphate!) but then fermentation rate should be limited by providing minimum nitrogen. In fact, again only for ultimate wine quality, the first 24 – 36 hours fermentation should commence relying only upon natural Nitrogen content then introduce 10 grams Diammonium phosphate but monitor fermentation rate daily and add further 5 gram DAP quantities the moment you see any sign of Nitrogen exhaustion (eg 1020 one day and 1018 next day = add 5g DAP immediately – but 1020 one day and 1012 next day then don’t add) – such an approach will produce ultimate quality if done religiously but we do not publish such advice because if fermentation runs out of Nitrogen at any point this will cause stuck fermentation.

Obviously Nitrogen is needed for cell growth – there is much confusion about the importance of ‘growing cells’ during fermentation, easiest way to understand why this is important is to appreciate that growing yeast cells (so they are producing bud like daughter cells – called budding) ferment x30 faster than stationary phase cells. A fermentation system with high cell numbers but where the cells are not growing WILL result in a stuck fermentation. So it’s important to provide Nitrogen to allow the yeast cell to manufacture new amino acids and proteins required for growth. However, providing too much nitrogen will result in reduced wine quality (sorry, too long a story to go into detail here – to do with producing more congeners during fermentation).

Where the fermentation system has sufficient trace nutrition then all yeast strains we have ever investigated in detail (circa 70+ strains) show no difference in Nitrogen requirement. So its incorrect to refer to some strains as ‘low nitrogen requirement’ and others as ‘medium or high’ – the truth is that much of the scientific data here is based on fermentation systems which have been limited by trace nutritional elements – under such circumstances some strains ‘cope better’ with the insufficiency in trace nutrition that others and then you do see differences between strains using different nitrogen levels. This gets complicated!

Bottom line – if you use Vintners Harvest Wine Yeast strains – 100% trace nutritional requirements have been met and so fermentation rate can be determined by DAP addition. Where total Nitrogen cannot be directly measured and you don’t want to record SG’s daily then;

Use 10g DAP where must has very heavy fruit content and only fermenting to 12% ABV
Use 15g DAP where must has medium fruit content and only fermenting to 12% ABV
Use 20g DAP where must has low fruit content and only fermenting to 12% ABV
Use 30g DAP where fermenting between 12% - 15% ABV (but especially watch for pH problems unless using very heavy fruit)
Use 40g DAP above 15% ABV (but especially watch for pH problems unless using very heavy fruit)

Hope this helps

When using yeast nutrient or yeast extract – keep additions to absolute minimum because natural sources of trace nutrition (from dead yeast) can confer off-flavour to the wine. Vintners Harvest trace nutrition contains only pure, food grade individual vitamins and trace minerals so does not confer off-flavour to the wine.

Cheers, the Technical Support Team at Brewcraft/Vintners Harvest





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