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Seibel Grapes


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#1 eldricko

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 02:21 AM

Firstly a disclaimer...I'm a complete novice
Secondly a compliment...far out what a site, it took a while to get here but what a find!

I will be buying my first ever grapes this weekend, they are Seibel (a convenience more than anything) what little I can find on the web suggests they are not of the best quality for winemaking, but as it is my first season I will happily make do.

Has anyone had any experience with this variety and happy to share their perspective on its journey to a palatable drop?

Thanks
Hamish




#2 Howie

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 04:06 AM

Seibel was the name of a French grape breeder. He developed hybrids about 100 years ago to combat the phylloxera pest, a North American bug that eats grape vine roots. He crossed native American varieties with European vinefera vatieties to produce both new rootstock and direct rooting vines. He made thousands of hybrid crosses, all identified by a number. The more successful ones eventually were given varietal names, such as Chancellor, Aurore, Cascade, Chelois, Colobel, DeChaunac, Rougeon, etc. From Winegrape Glossary (link) the following Seibel varieties are listed: Seibel 14 - Seibel 123 - Seibel 405 - Seibel 1000 - Seibel 2007 - Seibel 4668 - Seibel 4986 - Seibel 5279 - Seibel 5437 - Seibel 5455 - Seibel 5474 - Seibel 5898 - Seibel 6468 - Seibel 6905 - Seibel 7053 - Seibel 8216 - Seibel 8357 - Seibel 9110 - Seibel 9549 - Seibel 10713 - Seibel 10878 - Seibel 11803 - Seibel 13035 - Seibel 13053 - Seibel 14596 - Seibel 14665.
So, to make a short answer long, I think you need to be more specific. smile.gif
Howie Hart

#3 red_feet

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 02:35 PM

Probably 20 years ago or more I made wine from deChaunac grapes. I used the wild yeast which was on the grape, 'cause I didn't know about good wine yeasts. sad.gif It made a reasonable wine, but I'm sure I could have done much better using the yeasts I use now. The seller I used to buy from eventually opened his own winery (Cave Springs) and ripped out all the deChaunac to plant 'better' grapes, so I only made the wine for maybe 8 to 10 years.

Ken wave.gif
bonum vinum laetificat cor hominis (at least I like to think so)

#4 rpage53

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 04:53 PM

QUOTE (red_feet @ Mar 24 2009, 02:07 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Probably 20 years ago or more I made wine from deChaunac grapes. I used the wild yeast which was on the grape, 'cause I didn't know about good wine yeasts. sad.gif It made a reasonable wine, but I'm sure I could have done much better using the yeasts I use now. The seller I used to buy from eventually opened his own winery (Cave Springs) and ripped out all the deChaunac to plant 'better' grapes, so I only made the wine for maybe 8 to 10 years.

Ken wave.gif

I have a similar story but it was 1975 and it was an excellent wine (Len Penachetti was barely out of high school then). I don't remember the number of the Seibel variety but it was an experimental planting that didn't produce enough for a commercial grower. It had been a vintage year but heavy rains in October bogged down the machines in the heavy clay. I cut 6 bushels by hand for a grower off Louth St. in St. Catharines I used to work for and got to keep 3. I remember being soaked to the skin in mud to my knees.
We used wild yeast and a natural MLF in the secondary and bottled before Christmas. Good local reds were unheard of in Ontario (Don Ziraldo was just starting his first batch of Foch and de Chaunac) and everyone that got a bottle drank it immediately. For many, it was the best wine they'd every had, but in all fairness we were competing against Baby Duck and Mogen David.

However, there are much better choices today. Read the thread on controlling acid in native grapes and tell us the number of the variety and someone will have specific suggestions.

Rick.

#5 eldricko

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Posted 24 March 2009 - 04:54 PM

Thank you gents - I'm pretty sure the owner of the vineyard isn't able to be more specific as to which strain of Seibel he grows. Not to worry, the wine making process interests me just as much as the consumption.

I'm from New Zealand and I think this may be one of the few plantations left of this grape - if all goes well I will certainly be looking for a more recognised varietal next time round.

Once again thank you for your comments - much appreciated.

Hamish




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