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Removing Co2


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#1 Stellar Cellar Feller

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 08:52 AM

I have tried stirring, whipping with an electric drill, and using a vacuum to remove CO2. Then bulk aging for a few month. There always seem to be a little gas left in the wine.

One method I use sometimes that I have never read about anyone trying.....

I get one of my wife's disposable vinyl gloves she uses in the kitchen. Then, after bottleing and before inserting the cork, I put my thumb over the bottle and shake the hell out of it. I do this until I can hear no more gas escaping. Seems to work well, and I don't notice any oxygen deterioration after aging.

My question is, does anyone else ever do this, and do you think it would add too much dissolved oxygen to the bottle of wine?????

I think longer bulk aging is best, but I don't have that many carboys.



#2 Curt

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 01:13 PM

I use the method you describe too but just after opening and prior to serving.

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#3 cajunwine

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 01:30 PM

I like to use this method on my 1 gallon batches. I use a screw on cap, shake and release. If I could only shake a 5 or 6 gallon carboy I would use it on them also.
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#4 voon

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 01:43 PM

I shake a 5 or 6 gallon carboy while sitting on a kitchen chair. I seal it well with a solid bung and keep my hand over it to keep it from popping out, then lay the carboy sideways across my knees, cradle it in my arms, and rock back and forth and side to side. Most of the weight is on your legs. You don't have to rock hard to get a strong mixing action. It does a good job, and it is easy to maintain a good grip on the carboy.

#5 red_feet

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 04:17 PM

QUOTE (voon @ Jan 3 2009, 03:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I shake a 5 or 6 gallon carboy while sitting on a kitchen chair. I seal it well with a solid bung and keep my hand over it to keep it from popping out, then lay the carboy sideways across my knees, cradle it in my arms, and rock back and forth and side to side. Most of the weight is on your legs. You don't have to rock hard to get a strong mixing action. It does a good job, and it is easy to maintain a good grip on the carboy.


"Rock-a-bye baby, in the treetop . . ." tongue.gif

Are you talking about a kit wine? I let my kit wines (the few I've made) sit in bulk for a few months prior to bottling, and don't have trouble with CO2. My wines made from fresh grapes (most of my effort) never give me trouble, but they've been racked 2 or 3 times prior to bottling.

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#6 Wade

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 04:38 PM

What temp is your wine when you are degassing? It should be at least 74 deg or it will be hard to get the C02 out of suspension. I use an electric vacuum pump for degassing, filtering, and racking now. I never had a problem using the Mityvac though, just beeded to upgrade as my back is getting worse so lifting 6 gallon carboy or more off the floor is not cutting it anymore!
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#7 voon

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 05:18 PM

I went and bought a 1.2 CFM vacuum pump from Harbor Freight today. Hopefully this'll be good for vacuum degassing, racking, and filtering.

#8 RSG

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Posted 03 January 2009 - 05:25 PM

QUOTE (voon @ Jan 3 2009, 06:50 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I went and bought a 1.2 CFM vacuum pump from Harbor Freight today.


Haaa......Harbor freight......wish I had one near me....oh ya, back to the topic. I use a wand and drill and degass for a few days. Bulk aging for two years usually takes care of any more CO2.

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#9 A_perfect_ashler

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 05:54 PM

I never had any problem with a little fiz in fact I kind of like it. I think it was a dandelion, beautiful yellow color plesent nose, with a few small bubbles. A very nice wine. I enterd/wasted one in a contest. The judges thought it was a fault, si much for the dumb judges. I have no intention of ever wasting another bottle of wine on wine judges again!

Dave W.

To drink the bubbles is heavenly, to put them in is devine!  David F. Warner 2005

It was the accepted practice in Babylon 4,000 years ago that for a month after the wedding, the bride's father would supply his son-in-law with all the mead he could drink. It was belived this would insure fertility. Mead is a honey beer and because their calendar was lunar based, this period was called the honey month, which we know today as the honeymoon.
da"Penicillin cures, but wine makes people happy." Alexander Fleming (1881-1955), the Scottish bacteriologist who discovered Penicillin in 1928.

#10 vernatd

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Posted 04 January 2009 - 07:43 PM

QUOTE (RSG @ Jan 3 2009, 03:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Haaa......Harbor freight......wish I had one near me....oh ya, back to the topic. I use a wand and drill and degass for a few days. Bulk aging for two years usually takes care of any more CO2.


I have ordered some things from Harbor Freight over the internet. They have an on-line catalog which is very good. I do have a couple Harbor Freight stores near me but I've ordered some things to be delivered to distant relatives. The shipping cost was a lot less than I would have had to pay if I had bought it and shipped it myself. As far as de-gassing, I haven't had any problems but I never bottle in less than about a year and as someone else mentioned, it will be racked a few times by then. The only one I sloshed a batch around a lot was while splash racking some elderberry to ged rid of the rotten egg smell. It worked.

#11 ff/medic

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Posted 09 January 2009 - 06:42 PM

I went to Harbor Frieght today and purchased one of those brake line bleeders. When I hooked it up, I was surprised at the amount of CO2 I was able to get out of the wine. When I originally degassed it I used the drill attachment over and over and with this thing I still got more. I think in the future I will still use both, the drill for heavy duty and the brake line bleeder to finish it off.

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#12 Cibo

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Posted 10 January 2009 - 07:17 AM

what one from harbor freight workd best?

#13 SouthernMan

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Posted 10 January 2009 - 07:22 AM

Right after secondary fermentation, I degass the wine with a degassing paddle attached to a cordless drill and then I let the wine bulk age for at least 6 months, some times longer depending on the type of wine I made.
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#14 junglelf3k

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 01:40 PM

QUOTE (A_perfect_ashler @ Jan 4 2009, 07:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I never had any problem with a little fiz in fact I kind of like it. I think it was a dandelion, beautiful yellow color plesent nose, with a few small bubbles. A very nice wine. I enterd/wasted one in a contest. The judges thought it was a fault, si much for the dumb judges. I have no intention of ever wasting another bottle of wine on wine judges again!

Dave W.


Love your last sentence - gave me a great big grin, thx!

#15 A_perfect_ashler

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 11:04 PM

QUOTE (junglelf3k @ Jan 12 2009, 02:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Love your last sentence - gave me a great big grin, thx!


Thanks Jungle elf,

That statment has held true for over 30 years and is just as true today!

Dave

To drink the bubbles is heavenly, to put them in is devine!  David F. Warner 2005

It was the accepted practice in Babylon 4,000 years ago that for a month after the wedding, the bride's father would supply his son-in-law with all the mead he could drink. It was belived this would insure fertility. Mead is a honey beer and because their calendar was lunar based, this period was called the honey month, which we know today as the honeymoon.
da"Penicillin cures, but wine makes people happy." Alexander Fleming (1881-1955), the Scottish bacteriologist who discovered Penicillin in 1928.




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