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Woops, Added 2x Metabisulfite, How To Fix


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#1 dbajaer

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Posted 25 November 2004 - 10:07 PM

By mistake I added 2X the amount of potassium metabisulfite, and the wine has the distinct odor and taste of too much SO2. This is in a 23 liter batch of Sharrz, I hope there is a way to reduce the SO2, any ideas?

#2 ronmar1

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Posted 25 November 2004 - 10:13 PM

Stir, Stir, Stir,
Rest,
Stir, Stir, Stir.

Try not to induce too much air into your wine,

and Stir Stir Stir.

IMHO
Ron

#3 leiavoia

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Posted 25 November 2004 - 11:16 PM

There isn't much you can do. I did the same thing (with 2.5x) and i can still smell it and taste it. Don't throw it out thow. Ferment it down all the way and then make a decision. Sweetening at the end might help too (sugar hides it).

#4 breumyster

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Posted 26 November 2004 - 04:37 AM

A good splash racking or two will probably help. Rack from your present fermenter to another, and let the wine splash as much as possible. This introduces air into the wine which will bind up some of the free SO2.

Let it sit for a week or so, and check it. If the burnt match smell is still evident. splash rack again. Since you only doubled the dose, your wine can probably be recovered.

#5 Vinmaker

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Posted 26 November 2004 - 07:02 AM

You should be fine. A double dose will not be fatal. Even if you added enough to bring the free SO2 to 100 ppm, it will still be ok. Some commercial wines are not that far off from 100ppm. Depending on where you are in the process. I would recommend you rack it into a bucket like bremyster suggested and then rack it into a carboy. Then let it sit for bulk aging under an air lock. Say 6 months time. The SO2 will slowly dissipate down to a more acceptable level where you should not be able to taste it.

I am not sure about the bound SO2. This may not come out. Also not sure if it settles out with the lees. Maybe some else knows how to get rid of bound SO2.

Happily Winemaking.

Waiting for the 2013 Harvest!


#6 lockwood1956

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Posted 26 November 2004 - 04:03 PM

I have been reading about how to make wine from all sorts of canned/dried/tinned/bottled fruit
Most of this stuff has sulphites added, the recomendation to get rid of said sulphites is through heat (80deg for ten minutes) but I have no idea what that would do to your particular batch, maybe though you could use this method after fermentation complete, but before ageing

just a thought,be interested to find out what the others thought.

cheers
Bob
Bob Morton N.G.W.B.J.(National Guild of Wine and Beer Judges)
Chairman: Yorkshire Federation of Amateur Winemakers and Brewers
Acting Secretary: Yorkshire Federation of Amateur Winemakers and Brewers

#7 Seb

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Posted 26 November 2004 - 04:44 PM

One or two racking with good splashing should fix the problem as others have said. I agree with this. But take care not to overexposed the wine to oxygen during this period. During ageing in carboy you should loose 5 ppm per month, 10 if it was in barrel. Wait few months and it should be nice.
Sébastien Mailloux
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#8 dbajaer

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Posted 26 November 2004 - 04:45 PM

Thanks for all of the great help, I have made a lot of wine and this is my first goof, I have 275 gallons of Chard finishing the last bit of secondary. I have also found another solution, I located a friend who just is finishing the same grape, he is still at about 3 brix and I asked him to not add his SO2 until I can test mine and we will use my batch of 6 gallons to mix with his 15 gallons, we should end up with a very good mix and then will retest the whole batch and make a final SO2 correction. I am usually so carefull, my 4 French Oak barrells of our new wine, I write down everything in a record book, every test, every addition and every action. I just got too very careless with this small batch. We live in Mexico and have to make our own Chardonnay, Mexico wine is very poor and pricy. We haul down a ton of wine kits from Canada, toss the ingrediants, dilute the concentrate to a brix of 23, use CY3079, Fermaid, test the total acid, add 1/2 of the amount indicated Tataric, keep the PH near 3.2 and at the right time do Malo. Watch the PH very close and stop it all when it start s to get too high. We llike the finished product too much! Seems we make more each year and never have any left at year end.....We would love to buy Chardonnay grapes in Nothern Baja but can not find a source. I hauled down a great press three years ago and have all but given up on being able to get grapes here. The concentrated juice so far has made some very nice wine, the french oak barrells help a lot, we add oak cubes to get the oak done in time to drink.....

#9 Vinmaker

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Posted 27 November 2004 - 08:07 AM

It sounds like you have quit a production going. Four french barrels. Very nice indeed. Welcome to the forum and hope to hear what you have to say on other topics.

I think it is a shame that you drink your chardonnay so quick. I think your chardonnay would be much better after 2 or 3 years. Have you been able to hold back any bottles for aging and tried them? Am I right?

Happily Winemaking.

Waiting for the 2013 Harvest!


#10 BB

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Posted 27 November 2004 - 01:05 PM

I had this same thing happen to my Muscadine, and was in a panic. I knew

splashing would help so I splahed the must 4 times. It never lowered to

less than 100 ppm. I wrote to Jack keller and he said to do this as many

times over a few days even to lower it. I checked my brother in law who

is a Chemist and he said a better way would be to infuse pure (I say again)

pure O2 into the mix. This should help. There is a third method, although

not mentioned very much its a last resort and only the experts should do

that is to put some Hydrogen Peroxide in it. I had the amount per 6 gal

but cant find the exact amount. But I believe its 1 cap of 3% H2O2 per

6 galUS. This will drop the So2 around 40 ppm instantly.


Bill

#11 breumyster

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Posted 27 November 2004 - 01:10 PM

Bill,

The peroxide trick works, but a couple of drops too much will turn a batch of wine into disgusting sludge. You're right, it shouldn't be attempted without the proper testing and calculations.

Bart

#12 BB

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Posted 27 November 2004 - 01:15 PM

Hi Bart, Yea I know. I hated to mention this but It is a another method.

I almost didnt post this. Thanks Bart

#13 BB

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Posted 27 November 2004 - 01:57 PM

Hi Bart, What I ment was I almost didnt mention anything about H2O2

on my original post. I Thought it a bit radical. But thanks for the reply.

Bill

#14 hades_ibex

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Posted 27 November 2004 - 02:13 PM

QUOTE (dbajaer @ Nov 26 2004, 05:17 PM)
test the total acid, add 1/2 of the amount indicated Tataric, keep the PH near 3.2 and at the right time do Malo.

I'm curious about your alterations of acid. You increase the acid by 50% with tartaric, and then do MLF to reduce malic acid? What does this do to the wine? Makes it more tart or less?
Cheers.

#15 P Cuthbert

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Posted 27 November 2004 - 02:17 PM

Hades;

Acid levels of wine are generally reported "as tartaric acid". This does not mean that it is measuring the tartartic acid, just that the total amount of acid is the equivalent of X% tartaric acid.


Hope this helps;

Pat




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