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What Happens When Yeast Get Too Cold?


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#1 sbl

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 04:18 AM

When yeast get too cold (below normal active range) do they just go dormant until it warms back up ir does it kill the yeast?

Also, when directions require activation at temps like 105F, how shoud you lower the temp of the activated yeast to working temp of must--especially when that will be near lower limit?
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#2 Bunghole

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 04:58 AM

QUOTE (sbl @ Nov 11 2008, 05:50 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
When yeast get too cold (below normal active range) do they just go dormant until it warms back up ir does it kill the yeast?

Also, when directions require activation at temps like 105F, how shoud you lower the temp of the activated yeast to working temp of must--especially when that will be near lower limit?



The yeast go dormant but if the temp gets below freezing then the yeast can die.I dont raise water temp to activate a yeast culture, what I do is add yeast to room temperature mustJohn
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#3 Luc Volders

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 05:43 AM

QUOTE (sbl @ Nov 11 2008, 11:50 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
When yeast get too cold (below normal active range) do they just go dormant until it warms back up ir does it kill the yeast?


They go dormant. Trust me on this, even freezing will
not kill all yeast.

Like Bunghole said: add yeast to room temperature must.

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#4 Jimraelee

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 06:49 AM

QUOTE (Luc Volders @ Nov 11 2008, 07:15 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
They go dormant. Trust me on this, even freezing will
not kill all yeast.

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#5 sbl

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 08:43 AM

QUOTE (Luc Volders @ Nov 11 2008, 06:15 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
They go dormant. Trust me on this, even freezing will
not kill all yeast.

Like Bunghole said: add yeast to room temperature must.

Luc

Thanks, My chiller is a converted freezer and it is sometimes exposed to temperatures below the set point of 65. When I restarted my blueberry wine it was starting to work, but stopped when the chiller dropped to 60.

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#6 mute dog

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 09:16 AM

your chiller would be a heater in my house right now...

I'm going to need to get a heating belt if I want to ferment anything this winter.
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#7 gregorio

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Posted 11 November 2008 - 10:38 AM

Yeast populations rarely die when frozen in must. Slightly different story when they are dry but I digress. The process will go dormant as temps fall and then wake up again when they get more hospitible. As long as they have something to eat when they wake up, they will be fine.

As for rehydrating yeast, the most reliable procedure is to add the freeze dried yeast to 105F chlorine free water along with your favorite rehyration nutrient. Keep it well stirred for 20 minutes (no longer or the yeast begin to suffer from lack of food) and then begin adding only enough must to lower the temp by 10F. Wait another 20 minutes and add more must to lower the temp another 10F. Keep this going until your culture is within 10F of the must and then pitch it.

BTW, macerating enzymes, tannins and Nitrogen containing nutrients such as DAP should not be added to the starter culture. Add the macerating enzymes to the must during crush, the tannins after fermentation gets started and the Nitrogen as the ferment approaches 20-30% drop in sugar. Too much Nitrogen can be detrimental to yeast development so it is best to wait until the population reaches a substantial density before adding it.
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