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Yeast For Seyval Grapes


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#1 mjl

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Posted 18 September 2007 - 03:46 PM

just wondering what yeast would work best with seyval grapes.I plan on getting some this weekend...

#2 fishtail

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Posted 18 September 2007 - 03:50 PM

QUOTE (mjl @ Sep 18 2007, 04:18 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
just wondering what yeast would work best with seyval grapes.I plan on getting some this weekend...

I'm going to use ICV-D47, but K1116 will work. I pulled down an article that recommends Cotes des Blancs (Epernay 2) for Seyval grown in cool climates. I would also guess that Premier Cuvee would work nicely but the nose with be a bit more yeasty. I have had great success with using D-47 to retain bouquet and crisp flavors, especially in Kiwi. Just ferment as close to 55 degress as you can.

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#3 bzac

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Posted 18 September 2007 - 03:55 PM

I'd pm Seb , he has worked with alot of hybrids and realy knows his stuff

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#4 TNWino

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Posted 18 September 2007 - 04:50 PM

There was an article in Winemaker some time ago. In the article a winemaker who had made Seyval for many years gave some general advice on brix, TA, and yeast. Don't recall the TA and brix recommendations, but the article recommended Cotes de Blancs. I followed the article's recommendations last year and was really pleased with the outcome. I plan to use the Cotes de Blancs again this year. Premier Cuvee was an alternate recommendation.

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#5 fishtail

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Posted 18 September 2007 - 05:20 PM

QUOTE (TNWino @ Sep 18 2007, 05:22 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
There was an article in Winemaker some time ago. In the article a winemaker who had made Seyval for many years gave some general advice on brix, TA, and yeast. Don't recall the TA and brix recommendations, but the article recommended Cotes de Blancs. I followed the article's recommendations last year and was really pleased with the outcome. I plan to use the Cotes de Blancs again this year. Premier Cuvee was an alternate recommendation.

Scott

That the one I found a few weeks ago. I had copied it into a text doc. Enjoy...
JOe

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#6 NorthernWiner

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Posted 18 September 2007 - 05:44 PM

I probably wouldn't use Premier Cuvée on an aromatic white like Seyval. It's a neutral yeast that really does nothing to enhance varietal character. Côtes des Blancs or D47 would be much better choices, IMO.

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#7 Paulthenurse

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 06:09 AM

Why don't you want the Seyval to go thru MLF? I have 500 lbs coming and I was going to do half as a straight fruity varietal and the other half I was going to do differently, looking more body. I was going to oak the wine and introduce an MLF fermentation. I'm ok with going Stainless Steel the whole way and not doing the MLF, but I wonder why he recommends NOT doing it?

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#8 NorthernWiner

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 06:18 AM

QUOTE (Paulthenurse @ Sep 19 2007, 07:41 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Why don't you want the Seyval to go thru MLF? I have 500 lbs coming and I was going to do half as a straight fruity varietal and the other half I was going to do differently, looking more body. I was going to oak the wine and introduce an MLF fermentation. I'm ok with going Stainless Steel the whole way and not doing the MLF, but I wonder why he recommends NOT doing it?

PTN

In general, most aromatic whites are not put through MLF because they lose their fruitiness. The apple flavors you get from the malic acid are replaced by the more buttery lactic acid flavors. I guess it all depends on which you prefer.

Steve Kroll
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#9 TNWino

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 05:02 PM

I had thought of trying to get a bit more character from a batch of seyval by oaking and doing MLF. It would be my first attempt at MLF and oak, so a bit daunting. (Especially since I really liked the fruity version I got last year!) Seb had given some advice previously that barrel-fermenting seyval provided nice results, but also indicated that seyval is never really going to be a full-bodied wine. It is related to Chardonnay, and should work well, I think, with MLF. Has anyone done this, and did you like the result?

Scott

#10 kenaisteve

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 07:38 PM

QUOTE (TNWino @ Sep 19 2007, 05:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I had thought of trying to get a bit more character from a batch of seyval by oaking and doing MLF. It would be my first attempt at MLF and oak, so a bit daunting. (Especially since I really liked the fruity version I got last year!) Seb had given some advice previously that barrel-fermenting seyval provided nice results, but also indicated that seyval is never really going to be a full-bodied wine. It is related to Chardonnay, and should work well, I think, with MLF. Has anyone done this, and did you like the result?

Scott


So as I sit here and sip last year's seyval, I was thinking of trying what you mention as well. I've traditionally gone for the full fruity taste, fermenting with the 71-b. However a number of the commercial wineries in the area have done a seyval and chardonnay blend that turns out great - boosts the chardonnay from the area that is marginal at best sometimes, and blends/complements the seyval nicely. Anyhow, you'd ferment it more with the D-47, oak it, and let it go through mlf. I'm thinking that if the seyval by itself isn't quite what I want, I'd get a Chardonnay kit and blend. Most of the locals use 20% chardonnay to 80% Seyval.




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