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Apple Wine From Store Bought Juice


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#1 NorthernWiner

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Posted 25 February 2007 - 04:00 PM

Here is a fast clearing apple wine recipe I've used several times now. The trick is in adding a little bentonite to the primary to aid in clarification.

A word about the ingredients. The apple juice you use should only list 100% juice in the ingredients, and no preservatives. Pasteurized juice is recommended. You can generally use whatever type of acid you have on hand. Since malic is the primary acid in apples, this is what I try to use. I find it gives it more of a fresh apple-like flavor to the finished wine. Acid blend or tartaric acid is perfectly fine if that's what's available. Also, I like to add some dried fruit. I've been using a mixture of raisins and "craisins", which are a dried cranberry snack. If you don't like stuff like this in your wine, feel free to omit it.

The recipe assumes that the apple juice you are using has a starting SG in the range of 1.040-1.050. The sugar addition will bring it up to 1.075-1.085. This will give you a finished ABV of around 10%, give or take. This is just a personal preference. In my opinion, too much alcohol in apple wine tends to bury some of the more delicate flavors, but if that's what you like, you can always add more sugar.

This wine is best when bottle aged for about 12 months.

Apple Wine From Juice

This recipe makes 1 US gallon. All ingredients, with the exception of yeast, may be multiplied for larger volumes. 1 packet of yeast is sufficient for up to 6 US gallons.

Ingredients:

1 gal apple juice, pasteurized and without preservatives
2 cups sugar
1/2 tsp malic acid (may substitute tartaric acid or acid blend)
1 tsp pectic enzyme
1/4 tsp grape tannin
1 tsp yeast nutrient
1 tsp bentonite
1 cup dried cranberries (optional)
1/2 cup raisins (optional)
1 campden tablet, crushed
1 pkt yeast (Lalvin ICV-D47 or Red Star Côtes des Blancs recommended)
Super Kleer KC (optional)

Method:

Add 1/2 cup hot water and bentonite to blender. Blend on high speed for 2 minutes to make a slurry. Leave covered and set aside until needed.

If using dried fruits, put into a bowl and pour just enough boiling water over to cover. Let sit for 30 minutes to allow fruit to rehydrate. After 30 minutes, put fruit and liquid into a blender or food processor. Pulse several times to chop up fruit. Set aside.

In a mixing bowl combine 1 cup warm water, 2 cups sugar, acid, pectic enzyme, tannin, yeast nutrient, and crushed campden. Mix well. In fermenting bucket, combine the apple juice and sugar mixture. Add bentonite slurry. Stir vigorously for two minutes.

Add chopped fruit mixture to bucket. You can also put the fruit into a small muslin straining bag or clean nylon stocking if desired.

Cover primary and allow to sit overnight. The following morning, uncover mixture and give one final stir. Rehydrate yeast according to package directions and pour into juice. Do not stir.

Cover primary loosely with lid or plastic tarp. Once fermentation begins, stir daily. If possible, try to ferment on the cool side; 60-65° F is ideal. After 5-7 days, rack into a carboy, leaving most of the sediment and fruit pieces behind. Do not worry about topping up completely at this stage. Add rubber bung and airlock, and allow fermentation to complete.

Once the SG reaches .996 or less, fermentation is finished. Rack off of the sediment and top up the receiving container (any cheap commercial white wine will work fine for this purpose). Allow wine to finish clearing. If it takes longer than 30 days to clear, Super Kleer KC can be used to accelerate the process. Follow the package directions. It will generally work in 7-10 days.

When wine has finished clearing, rack into a clean container, top up, and add 1 crushed campden tablet. Filtering is recommended if you have the equipment available. At this stage you can also sorbate and sweeten if desired. Sweetening is a matter of personal taste. I prefer apple wine with residual sugar around 3%, but feel free to adjust it to your liking. To sweeten to 3%, mix 1/2 cup of sugar and 1/2 tsp potassium sorbate with 1/4 cup hot water. Mix thoroughly and stir into finished wine. Allow to set two weeks after sweetening to ensure fermentation does not start again, then bottle.


Steve Kroll
President, Purple Foot Winemaking Club
"41 Years of Fine Winemaking"
www.purplefoot.org


Wine a little... and you'll feel much better!


#2 red_feet

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Posted 25 February 2007 - 05:20 PM

QUOTE (NorthernWiner @ Feb 25 2007, 05:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Here is a fast clearing apple wine recipe I've used several times now. The trick is in adding a little bentonite to the primary to aid in clarification.
[edited]
When wine has finished clearing, rack into a clean container. Filtering is recommended if you have the equipment available. At this stage you can also sorbate and sweeten if desired. Sweetening is a matter of personal taste. I prefer apple wine with residual sugar around 3%, but feel free to adjust it to your liking. To sweeten to 3%, mix 1/2 cup of sugar and 1/2 tsp potassium sorbate with 1/4 cup hot water. Mix thoroughly and stir into finished wine. Allow to set two weeks after sweetening to ensure fermentation does not start again, then bottle.


Thanks for the recipe; I copied it (don't know when I'll make it).
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#3 Jim Fleming

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Posted 25 February 2007 - 07:49 PM

Winer...

Good looking recipe, we've gotta BUNCH of frozen concentrate of 100% pure apple juice... We're ready to start a batch of the stuff anyway, we'll reconstitute the juice and make up a 6 gal batch and let ya know how it goes... We're all for quick clearing wine no matter what flavor it is... wink.gif

Thank you, Sir... smile.gif

QUOTE (NorthernWiner @ Feb 25 2007, 05:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Here is a fast clearing apple wine recipe I've used several times now. The trick is in adding a little bentonite to the primary to aid in clarification.

<snipped for brevity>



Jim and Morisa Fleming


#4 NorthernWiner

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Posted 25 February 2007 - 10:42 PM

Please note that I edited this to mention adding another campden tablet at the final racking (it wasn't mentioned in my original recipe either, but I always just do it out of habit). Sorry for the omission.

-NW

Steve Kroll
President, Purple Foot Winemaking Club
"41 Years of Fine Winemaking"
www.purplefoot.org


Wine a little... and you'll feel much better!


#5 Jim Fleming

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 03:05 PM

Thanks, Steve, for alerting us to the omission. Now we've got the doc edited to the moment, etc...

Take Care,

QUOTE (NorthernWiner @ Feb 26 2007, 12:14 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Please note that I edited this to mention adding another campden tablet at the final racking (it wasn't mentioned in my original recipe either, but I always just do it out of habit). Sorry for the omission.

-NW



Jim and Morisa Fleming


#6 TheWannaBe

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 01:58 PM

Started batch today. Got a great deal on apple juice so I thought I will try this one out. Starting gravity is at 1.082. I only added raisins, not cranberries. Will post more through out the process. Cheers. al_coholic.gif

#7 Nankingcherry

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Posted 06 April 2007 - 08:16 PM

That sounds great... I've got a new 12gal primary just sitting around waiting for its maiden voyage.

Steve

#8 fishtail

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Posted 07 April 2007 - 11:10 AM

I like the idea of the cranberries in the background of the apple. This fall when I racked my apple cider, I had about 60% of a gallon jug left over from the 5 gallon batch. I also racked black plum the same day and had enough to finish off the jug. What a surprise that one was. The plum brings up the apple and visa versa. I'll do it on purpose this fall, but if you have any plums laying around with all of that apple juice, I'd give it a whirl as well.

A question on the craisins though, do they add as much body as raisins, or are they just for flavor? Cranberry wine needs help in the body department, so I was wondering if the craisins would help.

Thanks,
JOe
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#9 fernvally

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Posted 07 April 2007 - 11:26 AM

Cranberry and Apple go very good together. I have not fermed the mix but I have blended the two and will continue to do so because my freinds and family (and I) really really like it. luxhello.gif

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#10 NorthernWiner

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Posted 07 April 2007 - 07:44 PM

QUOTE (fishtail @ Apr 7 2007, 12:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I like the idea of the cranberries in the background of the apple. This fall when I racked my apple cider, I had about 60% of a gallon jug left over from the 5 gallon batch. I also racked black plum the same day and had enough to finish off the jug. What a surprise that one was. The plum brings up the apple and visa versa. I'll do it on purpose this fall, but if you have any plums laying around with all of that apple juice, I'd give it a whirl as well.

A question on the craisins though, do they add as much body as raisins, or are they just for flavor? Cranberry wine needs help in the body department, so I was wondering if the craisins would help.

Thanks,
JOe

JOe,

The craisins will add more flavor than body, while the raisins add body. Apple is a lot like cranberry I suspect in that it also needs some help in the body department.

Steve

Steve Kroll
President, Purple Foot Winemaking Club
"41 Years of Fine Winemaking"
www.purplefoot.org


Wine a little... and you'll feel much better!


#11 agravehra

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Posted 11 April 2007 - 06:29 PM

Steve,

Thanks for that recipe. I just finished stage one of your recipe (about 10 minutes ago) and will be adding the yeast tomorrow morning. So far it is looking good and I am very excited to try it out. The only item I did not add was raisins/craisins, as I wanted to see what the apple wine would be like on its own.

Thanks!

Ryan

#12 Texvino

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Posted 11 April 2007 - 09:29 PM

I made some apple spice wine made with raisins, ginger, and cloves and although the cloves turned out to be a little overwhelming it was a great product and I will make some apple spice wine again sometime soon so it will be ready come fall. Thanks for the recipe, I may try that one out

#13 Craiger

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Posted 12 April 2007 - 04:33 PM

Northern Winer,
I noticed your recipe doesn't mention degassing. Is that something you do? Just curious. I have 2 gallons of your recipe clearing right now. It already tastes great. I'm looking forward to bottling.

#14 NorthernWiner

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Posted 12 April 2007 - 05:01 PM

QUOTE (Craiger @ Apr 12 2007, 06:05 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Northern Winer,
I noticed your recipe doesn't mention degassing. Is that something you do? Just curious. I have 2 gallons of your recipe clearing right now. It already tastes great. I'm looking forward to bottling.

Degassing? Only after eating Mexican food. blink.gif

Seriously, I don't do anything more than give it a good 5-minute stir when it's done fermenting and then let it sit for a month under airlock to allow natural degassing. I also filter before bottling and that seems to drive off any remaining CO2.

I suppose something like a Mity-Vac would work, since the wine would remain under vacuum, but I wouldn't recommend using a whip. Apple wine oxidizes easily and you really want to keep air contact to a minimum.

Steve

Steve Kroll
President, Purple Foot Winemaking Club
"41 Years of Fine Winemaking"
www.purplefoot.org


Wine a little... and you'll feel much better!


#15 fishtail

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Posted 13 April 2007 - 06:50 AM

QUOTE (NorthernWiner @ Apr 12 2007, 05:33 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Degassing? Only after eating Mexican food. blink.gif

Seriously, I don't do anything more than give it a good 5-minute stir when it's done fermenting and then let it sit for a month under airlock to allow natural degassing. I also filter before bottling and that seems to drive off any remaining CO2.

I suppose something like a Mity-Vac would work, since the wine would remain under vacuum, but I wouldn't recommend using a whip. Apple wine oxidizes easily and you really want to keep air contact to a minimum.

Steve

I've also noticed that my wines have been degassed after I filter them. Them should add that to the advertising strategy...
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