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Mold In My Carboy


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#1 Bigmagic

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Posted 14 December 2006 - 03:28 PM

I have had a carboy of peach wine sitting in a corner of my "winery". My kids put some things over it and subsequently pushed the airlock over just enough to let some air into the carboy. Now there is mod at the top. Do you think the wine is still any good?, or do I need to scrap the whole thing? I'm pretty bummed about the whole thing.

Bigmagic

#2 P Cuthbert

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Posted 14 December 2006 - 03:31 PM

Can you describe this mold? Or take some pictures of it? Some molds do not spread through the wine, but are simply a surface mold. These can be remedied by "floating the mold out of the carboy and treating with SO2.

If you are in doubt, then you wish to simply dump this one and start fresh.

Pat

#3 bzac

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Posted 14 December 2006 - 03:37 PM

dump it
Above all relax , it's winemaking ,it's not supposed to be stressfull . It's not sky diving.

Zac Brown

#4 Powelln

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Posted 14 December 2006 - 03:53 PM

I believe that I've got the same problem with my cab sauv at the moment. Sorry, no pictures available, but it started growing a crusty layer around the top in both carboys in the past week. What was kind of puzzling was this was after I had halted a rather extended MLF by sulfiting and adding lysozymes. The growth started about 2 weeks after adding the sulfites and lysozymes. I believe that the airlock had kept a good seal. I floated out as much as I could, racked into 2 new 5 gal carboys, and added a fresh & generous 5/16 tsp of k-meta to each carboy (probably was closer to 1/4 tsp). Tastes and smells OK so far, but will be keeping a close eye on it. My plan was to keep it pretty heavily sulfited while it's clearing. At the moment, throwing out 10 gal of wine is not an real attractive option if I can help it.

I also debating about adding a second dose of lysozyme. Will lysozymes also hydrolyze cell walls in fungal cells like ML bacteria?

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#5 Wade's Wines

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Posted 14 December 2006 - 08:18 PM

If it was me I'd taste it...a half glass today, a glass tomorrow...and so on. If my toenails start to grow fast I'd dump it!
...or not...!
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#6 MartyYule

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Posted 14 December 2006 - 08:59 PM

QUOTE (Powelln @ Dec 14 2006, 05:25 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I believe that I've got the same problem with my cab sauv at the moment. Sorry, no pictures available, but it started growing a crusty layer around the top in both carboys in the past week. What was kind of puzzling was this was after I had halted a rather extended MLF by sulfiting and adding lysozymes. The growth started about 2 weeks after adding the sulfites and lysozymes. I believe that the airlock had kept a good seal. I floated out as much as I could, racked into 2 new 5 gal carboys, and added a fresh & generous 5/16 tsp of k-meta to each carboy (probably was closer to 1/4 tsp). Tastes and smells OK so far, but will be keeping a close eye on it. My plan was to keep it pretty heavily sulfited while it's clearing. At the moment, throwing out 10 gal of wine is not an real attractive option if I can help it.

I also debating about adding a second dose of lysozyme. Will lysozymes also hydrolyze cell walls in fungal cells like ML bacteria?

Noel

there is somthing seriously wrong here. If you have an air lock with a meta solution in it and the Carboy is is topped up how couldthe mold develop in the first place? Mold cannot develop or can it grow in wine with out O2.

#7 MinnesotaMaker

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Posted 14 December 2006 - 09:07 PM

QUOTE (Bigmagic @ Dec 14 2006, 04:00 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I have had a carboy of peach wine sitting in a corner of my "winery". My kids put some things over it and subsequently pushed the airlock over just enough to let some air into the carboy. Now there is mod at the top. Do you think the wine is still any good?, or do I need to scrap the whole thing? I'm pretty bummed about the whole thing.

Bigmagic

Back in my day-in-age, if I had done this to my ol' man's peach wine, he probably would have locked me in the closet with the carboy and made me drink the stuff; we ain't dunna dump it out... there's sober drunks in China you know.

Kinda like when you got caught smoking and they made you smoke a whole pack till you puked. Man.... those were the days.

#8 Francis Eric

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 01:51 AM

Do you live anywhere near Illinois ----If your going to dump it-- You could sent it to me.

Posibaly mycoderma I have had that
(I left a wine ferment with no vintners around piched yeast 5 minutes before vacation
I put a garbage bag For the over flowing, because I knew that was going to happen.)

Anyways
Top up carboy with a turkey baster full of liquid to over flow the mold
(flowers of wine)(sounds pleasent).
Add one 1/4 Tsp. Of sulfite per 5 gallons of wine -- or 5 crushed campden tablets.stir in
RAck into a sanitized carboy.

Another thing I have heard On JAck Kellers site is that contact time with sufite solution sould be 2 mintues
The sufite gases sanitize also.
I have Must of gotten lucky, better safe then sorry.

Quoted from Jack Keller(advanced winemaking problems and answers.)
http://winemaking.ja...et/problems.asp

QUOTE
Flowers of Wine: Small flecks or blooms of white powder or film may appear on the surface of the wine. If left unchecked, they grow to cover the entire surface and can grow quite thick. They are caused by spoilage yeasts and/or mycoderma bacteria, and if not caught at first appearance will certainly spoil the wine. If caused by yeast, they consume alcohol and give off carbon dioxide gas. They eventually turn the wine into colored water. The wine must be filtered at once to remove the flecks of bloom and then treated with one crushed Campden tablet per gallon of wine. The saved wine will have suffered some loss of alcohol and may need to be fortified with added alcohol (brandy works well) or consumed quickly. If caused by the mycoderma bacteria, treat the same as for a yeast infection. The Campden will probably check it, but the taste may have been ruined. Taste the wine and then decide if you want to keep it. Bacterial infections usually spoil the wine permanently, but early treatment may save it.

Prevent the introduction of spoilage yeasts and mycoderma the same way you prevent the introduction of vinegar yeasts.

Flowers of wine are, of course, expected when using flor sherry yeast. In such a circumstance, there is no way to know if the flowers are from the flor sherry yeast or a harmful infection. Pre-treating the must with Campden, however, should eliminate a harmful infection.
It could be Brett --- for that you would add sulfite also,
but if it is somthing else that requiers somthing else. -----
AT least you tryed instead of letting it turn to colored water.(Thats what Mycoderma does.)

Oh when I had it I just added sufite in the primary, and let it be for a day or two..
The second time on another wine I wipped the inside of the demi john with sufite, and added sulfite's
wine maker magazines web site -says
even vinegar bacteria can be stopped, but you have to act fast.

#9 jca

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 03:43 AM

QUOTE (MartyYule @ Dec 14 2006, 10:31 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
there is somthing seriously wrong here. If you have an air lock with a meta solution in it and the Carboy is is topped up how couldthe mold develop in the first place? Mold cannot develop or can it grow in wine with out O2.


Bigmagic already said the airlock seal was compromised and air got in.

Francis has you on the right track, Bigmagic. I had three carboys (2 wines from kits and 1 from fresh grapes) that developed that white, floating film with several "blooms". All the reading I did on "wine problems" - including the always helpful site from Jack Keller - pointed to mycoderma. Treat the wine asap to avoid further damage.

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#10 Francis Eric

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 02:42 PM

Just thought I'd add somthing Funny that happend to me, before this post gets to old.

I had At least 20 Lbs pear's chopped up in a 3 gallon pan packed in with alittle water.(enough though)
I left it sit for 2 weeks at around 65 degree's Not Good I know.

I looked in there, and seen A Mold spore growing I scopped it out,
and It was a Pear seed that hatched.

I thought they neede cold stratification(winter time)Like A web site recomends.--
Or they "might not germinate for two years"

#11 luckyinkentucky

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 04:19 PM

A wise man once told me ... "If you can't identify it .... DUMP IT!"

There are so many toxic molds out there that I would rather just do away with the wine as to chance drinking it. Even after 'sanitizing' some mold spores can remain. Straight bleach is the only thing I know of that will completely kill it, and I'm not sure you want to be adding THAT to your wine.

I don't mess with mold for one reason only. A local guy here from Maceo, KY got a flesh eating bacteria from eating a piece of moldy bread. You may have seen his story on 'Ripley's Believe it or Not'. The doctors traced the culprit as the mold from the bread, and he had to have half of his face removed along with his eyes, and his nose. I don't mess with mold. unsure.gif Mother Nature never intended us to consume it, and we should steer clear of it.

#12 bzac

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 05:38 PM

I agree , all of the products give off by molds are toxic , some people are very sensitive to molds.

for example , you ever wonder why so many childeren have peanut alergies now and when we were kids we lived on peanut butter sandwiches?

well what happened was ,

35 years ago , canada and mostly the USA were the only people who realy ate peanut butter .

Well with globalisation peanut butter ( and all kinds of peanut products) is now eaten every where .

this resulted in peanut farming on a scale undreamed of 35 years ago.

peanuts are stored in huge silos , before they get roasted, fungi love these warm moist environments.

the toxic mold byproducts gather in the oils of the nut.

the contaminated nuts cause 4% of the population to have an reaction. hence your nut allergies!

molds are not things to be messed with.

I spend alot of time working on sick buildings , mold is often the problem.

Zac
Above all relax , it's winemaking ,it's not supposed to be stressfull . It's not sky diving.

Zac Brown

#13 Francis Eric

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Posted 15 December 2006 - 06:29 PM

Different Molds atack different things.
Put a piece of bread out, and it could turn black(The scientific names are hard to remember) or white.
http://en.wikipedia....lack_bread_mold
Put a piece of carrot juice out, and it will be a certain color(Probaly white or green. -- I've seen it.)

Cheese anyone -- http://en.wikipedia....arter_Front.jpg

Take Rye bread for Instance -- That is made out of Rye Ergot makes you halucinate
I have never heard of other breads doing that.

Yeast are a type of fungus

That is just one good example.
mycology might be a good search. --- I could even Post a link of a Email address So you could ask.

Before you do Or if you do A good question would be is there such a thing as
invisable mold That could grow On a wine, and you wouldn't be able to notice.

#14 Bigmagic

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Posted 16 December 2006 - 01:37 PM

QUOTE
Can you describe this mold? Or take some pictures of it? Some molds do not spread through the wine, but are simply a surface mold. These can be remedied by "floating the mold out of the carboy and treating with SO2.


It's a light yellow mold somewhat lumpy. That's about the best it can be described. I hate the thought of dumping the whole thing if it can be saved.

Bigmagic

#15 luckyinkentucky

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Posted 16 December 2006 - 01:39 PM

QUOTE (Bigmagic @ Dec 16 2006, 02:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
It's a light yellow mold somewhat lumpy. That's about the best it can be described. I hate the thought of dumping the whole thing if it can be saved.

Bigmagic



Would you drink it if you found out the mold was a deadly toxin? Even after 'saving' it? Would you feel safe with giving it to friends, and family?




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