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#1 jakelevi

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Posted 08 May 2004 - 05:06 AM

I am curious as to the size of the backyard , home vineyards here, the non commercial ones, and even the botique sizes,

I have half dozen lambruscas, concord and niagara, and two cascades, but putting in about 30 northern hybrids, 2/3rds red and balance white. It looks like we will wind up with around 40 total.

#2 JDM

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Posted 08 May 2004 - 05:41 AM

jake

excellent topic......it will be interestng to see what sizes are out there....from our experience of our customers we have guys that have hundreds of acres to guys that have two vines.....we grew this business catering to the small guy so we try and make sure we treat them all the same

sometimes the guys with the 2 vines or more are more intense than the guys with hundreds of acres.....

in racing for those of us that have been in it for more than half our lives we say the cause of that intense attitude is because "for the love of the sport"

in the wine or vineyard industry it appears to be the same attitude so maybe we should call it "for the love of the vine" or better yet "for the love of the hobby"

will be interesting to see how many vines people have in their back yard...40 vines will keep you busy and provide hours of enjoyment and frustration i am sure....lol

joe

#3 slonaker

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Posted 08 May 2004 - 10:09 AM

Okay, that makes an excellent segue into my question. About what size (for the home winemaker) vineyard do you "need" to actually produce enough grapes for, say, 20 gallons of wine? I'd like to try putting in some vines, but not sure how many I'd need in what size of an area to make enough for a few batches. I'm sure you always want to grow more than you'll need because they're not all going to be top-notch producers.

I just got the book "From Vines to Wines" the other day. I guess I should actually read the thing, huh?
"If at first you don't succeed....use it in a marinade."
Ed Slonaker
El Pilon Wines
Corpus Christi, Texas <- NEW LOCATION!
www.elpilon.com/wines

#4 JDM

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Posted 08 May 2004 - 03:36 PM

yeah.....all you have to do is read to page 32 in vines to wine to read that one mature vine will yield 8-12 pounds of grapes...it takes 11-12 lbs of grapes to yield 1 gallon

start growing

joe

#5 jakelevi

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Posted 08 May 2004 - 04:58 PM

There is a big difference between varieties too,

if you had 20 cascades you'd probably be making what you want and selling grapes and juice too,

they are huge producers, there might be more productive but I havent heard of them,

so, add to how many vines folks have, what kind too,

#6 Haagen

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Posted 09 May 2004 - 06:03 PM

From what I gather on average a vine produces 6.5 kilos of fruit. However, Shiraz has a larger output than cab sav. I don't believe I've ever read anything more specific. I've read plenty that says "yield per acre" but they neglect to mention variety and vine density which make the numbers next to useless.

#7 VCV

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Posted 09 May 2004 - 06:54 PM

Out of 147 commercial Oregon vineyards , the average yield for Syrah was approximately 2.5 tons per acre in 2000 and 2001 (Oregon Ag Stats, 2002), which, assuming a high density planting of 1000 vines per acre, is quantified by assuming 5 lbs of fruit per vine is a reasonable yield. I think the data may be slightly skewed however, and I feel that 6 lbs per vine is not unreasonable for Syrah, Merlot, Pinot Noir and other red vinifera varieties grown in cool or cold climates.

Best - J

#8 HonkingGooseWine

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Posted 10 May 2004 - 02:19 PM

I have an acre of total land in Sonoma and about 1/4 +- in grapes. Half my vines are Sangiovese with the other half in Voignier for a total of 110 vines. I get between 40 to 60 gallons of wine a year depending on weather, birds....

It does take up a fair amount of time to tend to the vines at different times of the year. Right now I'm walking down the rows and trimming off suckers every chance I get. To me pruning is an enjoyable walk but, I don't do it everyday.

Frank Mason
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#9 Draftsman28

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Posted 10 May 2004 - 02:40 PM

I am a fruit/veggie gardener who has recently gotten interested in growing wine grapes and making wine. I live in a vinyl clad subdivision (huge mistake) and the last 25' of my lot is fenced off for garden use, approx 90' x 25' area. I have recently planted 1 row of 5 vines with room for two more rows in approx 20' x 30' area. The rest is dedicated to 4 rows strawberries, 20' x 20' area for tomatoes & peppers, 4 blueberry plants and 1 blackberry, I also have room for cantalopes.

I use to plant green beans and lots of other stuff unsucessfully. Green beans are hardly worth the work when you can buy them on sale 3-4 cans for a buck.

Eventually I hope to have enough wine grapes to make a few small batches. I always have tons of strawberries which I'll make some wine from as well as the black & buleberries when the reach maturity next year. With the recently new addition to my family I'm trying to get into more perianials which are a bit less work than annual fruits & veggies. After you've grown your own produce to perfect ripeness and flavor you never go back to store bought....at least I won't

#10 Hippie

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Posted 10 May 2004 - 06:41 PM

I have 9 raised beds 4' X 12' with 2 Blackberry plants in each. 3 different thornless erect varieties. I have 18" pea gravel paths between beds. I will eventually plant 9 more of a different variety for better pollination. In a few years, the beds will be thick with plants that spread by roots and weeds will not be a problem. 18 of these hybrid blackberry bushes will make lots of wine. 27 will make lots of wine and lots of jelly.
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#11 starrfarms

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Posted 10 May 2004 - 11:28 PM

I have 42 Pinot Noir, and 22 Viognier. We also have 3 trellises of about 40 ft long of each; Marionberry, Boysenberry and Loganberry. 12 blueberries, 6 currants, 2 peaches, 3 apples, 2 pears, 2 cherries, 5 ariona berries and 3 plum trees.
I've got a bunch of fruit, but despite all of the stuff I've planted I still have more grass than I want to mow. And I live on just over an acre.
Thad

#12 Draftsman28

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Posted 13 May 2004 - 07:33 AM

Glenvall,
Any recomendations on which verity of blackberry makes the best wine? I havent done much research on blackberries the verity I picked up at the home store was thornless Kiowa I believe. Thanks

#13 Hippie

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Posted 13 May 2004 - 06:51 PM

wyat, Kiowa is akin to the Apache, Arapaho, and dern I forgot the other variety I have. They were developed by the University of Arkansas which has developed several varieties of Peaches, Plums, Blackberries, soybeans, etc. I think Brazos Blackberries probably make the best wine, but they are very thorny and not as hardy. Very popular in Texas. You might check them out somewhere on the net. I think Jack Keller talks some about them on his site. The 'Indian' varieties developed at U of A make lots of very large, quarter size berries on thornless, erect plants. That is the reason I chose them. Lots of production - lots of wine!
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#14 jakelevi

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Posted 21 May 2004 - 06:18 PM

I forgot to mention our berrys

currently have two concords and a half dozen cuttings developing, two niagara yearlings, 2 ea cascade and catawba, and ten frontenac, and plan to add ten to twenty more, next year 12-15 prairie star and perhaps a half dozen lacrosse or lacrescent,

also a half dozen new black raspberries, and planting another dozen thornless blackberrys. and have a couple dozen strawberrys that should expand to a hundred or so, most of those will make jam and shortcake. The blackberrys into jam and some wine, maybe, if any is left.

#15 slonaker

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Posted 22 May 2004 - 03:34 PM

QUOTE
Kiowa is akin to the Apache, Arapaho, and dern I forgot the other variety I have.


Navajo or Chickasaw, perhaps? I got one of those "plants-by-mail" catalogs and they show them all in there.

I tried growing some of those down here but our stupid neighbor's cows at all of 'em. mad.gif I told him I wanted a steak dinner as retribution.
"If at first you don't succeed....use it in a marinade."
Ed Slonaker
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www.elpilon.com/wines




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